Wellness

Roaming Goats, Sentient Sourdough, and Other Stories to Read this Weekend

Roaming Goats, Sentient Sourdough, and Other Stories to Read this Weekend

Every week, we corral compelling wellness stories from around the internet just in time for weekend reading. We decided to take a break this week from our pandemic-specific roundups (The New York Times has you covered there), and instead we’re sharing four stories that offered us a brief respite from our anxieties.

  • The Goats Have Overrun a Town in Wales

    The Goats Have Overrun a Town in Wales

    The Cut

    In Wales, goats have taken over the deserted streets of a small resort town, and a Getty photographer has been on the scene to capture the most pure paparazzi photos we’ve seen. It looks like the goats have been respectful, mostly strolling the sidewalks, lounging in the grass, and taking advantage of the humans’ self-isolation. On one occasion though, the goats stopped for a quick snack on some hedges and a police car was seen chasing the group away. We’re thankful that a Manchester Evening News reporter has been capturing it all on Twitter.

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  • The Existential Musings of My Rustic-Sourdough Starter

    The Existential Musings of My Rustic-Sourdough Starter

    The New Yorker

    Whether you’ve just hopped on the sourdough train or you were on this trend before it was trendy, you know: In the first few weeks with your sourdough starter, after you named it and fed it and tended to its fickle needs, you asked: What are you thinking? Who are you, really? (Or maybe you didn’t, and we’ve all just been stuck inside too long.) The New Yorker’s Sophie Lucido Johnson gives her starter a voice in this animated comic.

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  • Five Facts about Birds

    Five Facts about Birds

    ¡Hola Papi!

    John Paul Brammer’s latest essay delivers five facts about birds—which, in itself, is a gift. (Birds are amazing!) But the piece is also insightful and absorbing, and it made us smile.

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  • History’s Deadliest Pandemics, from Ancient Rome to Modern America

    History’s Deadliest Pandemics, from Ancient Rome to Modern America

    The Washington Post

    It can be comforting (for some) to know that this isn’t the world’s first pandemic, and historians can help give context to what we’re currently experiencing. Reporter Michael Rosenwald shares an overview of the history of pandemics, starting with the Antonine Plague in 165 AD and looking at how they each changed the world and what lessons we learned.

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