Wellness

Can Sleep Divorce Save a Relationship? + Other Stories

Can Sleep Divorce Save a Relationship? + Other Stories

Every week, we corral our favorite wellness stories from around the internet—just in time for your weekend reading.

  • Why Everyone Should Sleep Alone

    Why Everyone Should Sleep Alone

    The Atlantic

    The practice of couples sleeping in separate bedrooms is nothing new. But the idea, more recently termed “sleep divorce,” has made a resurgence: Writer Malika Rao takes a look at how the bedroom influences a couple, either by bringing them together or driving the apart.

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  • As Tropical Rainforests Disappear, So Do Potential Medicine Reservoirs

    As Tropical Rainforests Disappear, So Do Potential Medicine Reservoirs

    Undark

    In the process of developing new medicines, scientists often rely on the natural diversity of plants, testing compounds discovered in tropical rain forests to potentially treat human illness. Which means that as rain forests face threats from climate change, fires, and deforestation, our pharmaceutical pipeline may be threatened, too.

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  • Can Babies Learn to Love Vegetables?

    Can Babies Learn to Love Vegetables?

    The New Yorker

    Baby food presents both parents and commercial baby food makers with the same problem: What’s healthy for infants doesn’t always taste the best, and trying to get a baby to eat food they don’t like…you might as well forget it. From taste tests at undisclosed laboratories to surveys of children’s eating habits, the quest to create nutritious baby food has become a colossal undertaking that requires an understanding of where food preferences come from—and whether we can control them at all.

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  • Your Diagnosis Was Wrong. Could Doctor Bias Have Been a Factor?

    Your Diagnosis Was Wrong. Could Doctor Bias Have Been a Factor?

    The Washington Post

    Tens of thousands of medical malpractice claims are filed every year. And researchers are beginning to uncover the cause of these considerable misjudgments: implicit biases based on the patient’s gender, race, and age.

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