Wellness

4 COVID-19 Stories Worth Reading Right Now

4 COVID-19 Stories Worth Reading Right Now

It’s never been more important to listen to the scientists, researchers, and doctors who are in the trenches of this pandemic, fighting to have their voices heard—and to amplify the most accurate data and information. Fortunately, there are some incredible journalists bringing those stories to us every day. Below, we’ve collected the four that we found most compelling this week.

Week of December 4

  • “No One Is Listening to Us”

    “No One Is Listening to Us”

    The Atlantic

    Outside of community efforts like social distancing and wearing masks, how we fare against the coronavirus relies on the ability of our medical professionals to handle sick patients: Do we have enough personnel in hospitals? Do they have enough PPE? Enough beds? What treatments are available, and do they work? While doctors and nurses are better informed and better equipped than they were in early spring of this year, those gains are threatened by the pandemic’s brutal third surge.

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  •  How COVID-19 Long Haulers Created a Movement

    How COVID-19 Long Haulers Created a Movement

    Medium

    For many COVID patients whose symptoms have lasted long after they were expected to resolve, getting treatment for their chronic condition has proved challenging. Those who never received a positive test struggle even to be believed their condition is related to the virus. So they’re organizing: Through online support groups, COVID long-haulers are advocating for recognition, research, and care—and conducting studies themselves to carve out their seat at the table.

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  • Social distancing is a luxury many can’t afford. Vermont actually did something about it.

    Social distancing is a luxury many can’t afford. Vermont actually did something about it.

    Vox

    Across the US, there’s a 25 percent infection rate among unhoused people. Vermont is the exception: There have been fewer than six COVID cases in Vermont’s homeless population, which is less than 1 percent. The state also has a low coronavirus spread generally: Its efforts serve as important model for the country by demonstrating not only how we can effectively approach protecting our most vulnerable but also how protecting our most vulnerable can protect us all.

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  • Now Is Not the Time to Travel to Indigenous Nations in the US

    Now Is Not the Time to Travel to Indigenous Nations in the US

    Lifehacker

    As with most communities of color in the US, COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting Indigenous people: Infection rates in Indigenous nations is 3.5 times higher than among White people, and younger people are contracting the virus in increasing numbers. In order to protect their own health, many Indigenous nations are exercising their sovereignty and asking people to refrain from visiting their territories.

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