Wellness

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3 Tools for Deep Self-Massage and Extra Length

Just one session with body-alignment specialist Lauren Roxburgh is eye-opening. Or more to the point: body-opening. Roxburgh is a master at helping helps clients work through myriad physical complaints—tech neck, sore wrists, slumped posture, bad back, you name it. The problems are as varied as her clients, but the reason behind them is usually the same: our increasingly sedentary ways. That’s where foam rolling comes in. And Roxburgh, who’s known as the body whisperer around goop, has us all singing its praises.

We could wax poetic (and we have) about the benefits of foam rolling, but all you really need to know is this: It’s basically a deep-tissue massage that you can do yourself in front of your TV. And now Roxburgh, who created our favorite foam roller ever, has three new ways to roll out all the knots and kinks that build up in the body after long days of sitting, texting, typing, hunching, and driving. Here, she shows you how to combat texting fatigue, give yourself a scalp massage, strengthen your pelvic floor, and more.

P.S. Roxburgh has a new book coming out this spring—The Power Source—which you can preorder now.

THE ALIGNED DOME

There’s a lot to love about these domes, mainly because Roxburgh designed them so they could be used on both sides for completely different effects. Use the pebbled side of one of the domes as a self-massaging tool to stimulate areas like the scalp, temples, hands, or feet. “Self-massages can help place you in a calm state,” says Roxburgh. To use the Aligned Dome in the self-massage way, place it on the floor and rest the area of the body you want to target on the dome. Gently roll the area over the dome. Roxburgh recommends doing a session on the domes at night and working the dome all the way down your body to release stress and tension that has built up throughout the day.

There’s a lot to love about these domes, because Roxburgh designed them so they could be used on both sides for completely different effects. Use the pebbled side of one of the domes as a self-massaging tool to stimulate areas like the scalp, temples, hands, or feet. “Self-massages can help place you in a calm state,” says Roxburgh. To use the Aligned Dome in the self-massage way, place it on the floor and rest the area of the body you want to target on the dome. Gently roll the area over the dome. Roxburgh recommends doing a session on the domes at night and working the dome all the way down your body to release stress and tension that has built up throughout the day.

Flip the dome over and the smooth side works as a stability tool for balancing exercises as well as strength and core workouts. Used as a pair, the domes create dynamic instability in different movements that help activate and train your deep core muscles. A plank, says Roxburgh, is a good place to start, but yoga poses (tree, warrior) can be leveled up using these domes. (You can use the domes barefoot, with socks, or with shoes.)



THE BODY SPHERE

We didn’t really know the idea behind an organ massage until Roxburgh showed us how soothing this malleable ball feels on our stomach. It must be how a puppy feels when he gets the world’s best belly rub. But that’s not to say there aren’t serious benefits. Roxburgh designed the sphere as a total-body massage tool for sore muscles, targeting areas—

like the abdominals and the lower back—where a traditional foam roller might be too dense. It also works as a small exercise ball for building core strength, especially in the pelvic floor—an area that Roxburgh says many people lose connection to with age.

We didn’t really know the idea behind an organ massage until Roxburgh showed us how soothing this malleable ball feels on our stomach. It must be how a puppy feels when he gets the world’s best belly rub. But that’s not to say there aren’t serious benefits. Roxburgh designed the sphere as a total-body massage tool for sore muscles, targeting areas like abdominals and lower back where a traditional foam roller might be too dense. It also works as a small exercise ball for building core strength, especially in the pelvic floor—an area that Roxburgh says many people lose connection to with age.

Place the sphere on a hard floor (not on a rug) and roll an area of your body over the ball. If you’re using this on a sensitive area, like your stomach, it can feel intense at first as you release tightness and stress. Roxburgh’s tip: Focus on breathing and relaxing. And she recommends starting with the ball inflated around 60 to 70 percent and gradually working your way up—the body sphere comes with a pump so you can fill it to your desired size and firmness.



THE INFINITY ROLLER

This is the mini roller you can take anywhere. Really: anywhere. Throw it in your purse (it’s that small) and give yourself a deep-tissue massage in any hotel room the world over. The unique shape was designed by Roxburgh to cradle small, hard-to-reach places and go deeper than a full-size foam roller can. But the soft, cushion-like foam works especially well for sore areas, like the feet, shoulder blades, forearms, and wrists, where the muscles attach to the joints. (Classic Roxburgh tip: Try the Infinity Roller on your feet after wearing heels.)

This is the mini roller you can take anywhere. Really: anywhere. Throw it in your purse (it’s that small) and give yourself a deep-tissue massage in any hotel room the world over. The unique shape was designed by Roxburgh to cradle small, hard-to-reach places and go deeper than a full-size foam roller. But the soft, cushion-like foam works especially well for sore areas, like the feet, shoulder blades, forearms, and wrists where the muscles attach to the joints. (Classic Roxburgh tip: Try the infinity roller on your feet after wearing heels.)

The reasons for the “infinity” part of the name are expectedly too long to list, but here’s a start: Place the roller on the floor, against a wall, or in a chair, and roll over the area you want to target. In your car, says Roxburgh, you can place the roller on your lower back to relieve tension while driving. Roxburgh says another great use of the roller is for traveling. The roller is lightweight and compact, and because it’s so portable, you can put the roller against the wall and work your shoulder blades. “Portability was important to me because I wanted to create a roller not just for using at the gym but for daily life,” says Roxburgh.



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