Style

Dressing the Entire World, One $25 T-Shirt at a Time

Photo courtesy of Gillian Garcia

Dressing the Entire World, One $25 T-Shirt at a Time

Dressing the Entire World,
One $25 T-Shirt at a Time

When Scott Sternberg parted ways with beloved preppy label Band of Outsiders back in 2015, no one knew for sure if he’d return to fashion. But earlier this spring he announced—via lo-fi video (more on that here)—that he was launching Entireworld, a new direct-to-consumer line focused on considered basics: a striped T-shirt, a boatneck sweater, cotton bikini briefs, none of which will break the bank. And yes, it’s that simple. Instead of ten different colors to choose from, there are, say, three. Sternberg’s well-honed design chops are still very much present. Even something as simple as a T-shirt is remarkable: The Type A T-shirt fits like no other. It’s snug in all the right places but not tight, neither too long nor too short, polished enough under a jacket for work, super flattering with cutoffs on the weekend.

A Q&A with Scott Sternberg

Q
After years of designing your own line, Band of Outsiders, then taking a break, why did you decide to go at it again?
A

I’m a serial entrepreneur. And not necessarily the best employee. So while I was approached about several jobs over the past few years since I left Band of Outsiders, in the back of my mind there was never really a question that I would launch another brand.



Q
What's the ethos of Entireworld?
A

Quite simply, Entireworld is the stuff you live in. The design ethos is about purity in fabric and design, a kind of modernist nostalgia, color, ease, democracy in pricing, and responsibility in sourcing and manufacturing. We’re focused on great tees, sweats, knitwear, button-ups, socks, and undies, elevating those everyday items into something covetable.

“The design ethos is about purity in fabric and design…”

The brand ethos is about building a better tomorrow, this idea of Utopia. I’m very into how certain films and ads in the past depicted the future as the ultimate Utopia, and how those ideas were reflected in great architecture and design of the ’50s and ’60s. These days, the future tends to be depicted as primarily dystopian, and I want Entireworld to be an antidote to that, a brand about inclusivity, global connectivity, and forward and positive thinking.


Q
Other than the small edit we're selling on goop, Entireworld is direct-to-consumer e-commerce. Why did you decide to go this route?
A

I’m excited to work outside of the traditional fashion system, both for the sake of the clothes, and for the sake of the way we communicate with our customers. Direct-to-consumer allows us to offer much lower prices for the same quality, which even informs the design process and allows for purity in the design: Sometimes a T-shirt just wants to be a great T-shirt in a cute color, which is tough to do when it costs upwards of $100. On the communication end, we’re creating our own framework and timeline for how we release product and share ideas, images and projects with our customers. This will allow us to innovate beyond traditional formats like fashion shows and look books.

“Sometimes a T-shirt just wants to be a great T-shirt in a cute color, which is tough to do when it costs upwards of $100.”

JUST THE BASICS


Q
What other brands out there do you admire? Who really gets it right?
A

I’m a fashion and design superfan. Some brands that come to mind right now are Lemaire, Paloma Wool, Sophie Buhai, Loewe, Yohji, Jacquemus, Spalwart, Craig Green, and Commes des Garçons. Fashion is a moving target, so the list is always changing, and the idea of what’s right is as well.

You may also like