Travel

Midtown Restaurants

Restaurant neighborhood
Brooklyn Diner
212 W. 57th St., Midtown
Considering the neon-covered exterior and old-school name, the atmosphere inside Brooklyn Diner is surprisingly fancy—after all, it's helmed by the award-winning Chef de Oliveira. That said, classic meals are definitely the standouts: The chicken soup, macaroni & cheese, and giant lunch salads are reliably great, and you’ll have to arrive early in the day if you want to have the chicken pot pie (they almost always run out). Expect a short wait if you forget to make a reservation. There are two locations in Midtown, on 57th and 43rd.
Midtown
Brooklyn Diner
155 W. 43rd St., Times Square
Considering the neon-covered exterior and old-school name, the atmosphere inside Brooklyn Diner is surprisingly fancy—after all, it's helmed by the award-winning Chef de Oliveira. That said, classic meals are definitely the standouts: The chicken soup, macaroni & cheese, and giant lunch salads are reliably great, and you’ll have to arrive early in the day if you want to have the chicken pot pie (they almost always run out). Expect a short wait if you forget to make a reservation. There are two locations in Midtown, on 57th and 43rd.
Midtown
Daniel
60 E. 65th St., Upper East Side
It doesn't get much better than Daniel when it comes to haute cuisine (and destinations for special occasions). From the exceptional French prix-fixe menu to the flawless service and elegant jacket-only dining room, it's a one-of-a-kind experience. For a slightly more casual (and reasonably priced) a la carte dining experience, head to the lounge. And for a special event, book their private Bellecour Room, which has windows facing 65th Street—a rarity for event rooms in the city.
Midtown
Dig Inn
150 E. 52nd St., Midtown
Dig Inn’s philosophy is “farm to counter,” which means that they serve sustainably sourced, usually local food in a casual setting and in a price range that makes it a reasonable option for everyday lunch. The salads and the market plates are easy to take back to the office (or home for dinner), and the menu changes with the seasons, so you won't ever be bored with the offerings. There are locations in Morningside Heights, Union Square, Tribeca, and in Midtown on 52nd, Madison, and 55th, in Lower Manhattan on Pine, Liberty, and Broad St., in Nomad, and off Madison Square Park.
Midtown
Dig Inn
275 Madison Ave., Midtown
Dig Inn’s philosophy is “farm to counter,” which means that they serve sustainably sourced, usually local food in a casual setting and in a price range that makes it a reasonable option for everyday lunch. The salads and the market plates are easy to take back to the office (or home for dinner), and the menu changes with the seasons, so you won't ever be bored with the offerings. There are locations in Morningside Heights, Union Square, Tribeca, and in Midtown on 52nd, Madison, and 55th, in Lower Manhattan on Pine, Liberty, and Broad St., in Nomad, and off Madison Square Park.
Midtown
Dig Inn
40 W. 55 St., Midtown
Dig Inn’s philosophy is “farm to counter,” which means that they serve sustainably sourced, usually local food in a casual setting and in a price range that makes it a reasonable option for everyday lunch. The salads and the market plates are easy to take back to the office (or home for dinner), and the menu changes with the seasons, so you won't ever be bored with the offerings. There are locations in Morningside Heights, Union Square, Tribeca, and in Midtown on 52nd, Madison, and 55th, in Lower Manhattan on Pine, Liberty, and Broad St., in Nomad, and off Madison Square Park.
Midtown
Four Seasons Restaurant (Closed)
99 E. 52nd St., Midtown
Housed in Mies van der Rohe's Seagram Building, this icon of a restaurant still honors its 1959 design by modernist Philip Johnson. Everything—from Philip Johnson's custom chairs and bar stools, to the metal chain curtains, to the Japanese-style pool in the middle of the dining room—is as true to the original concept as possible, making a meal here something of a field trip for Modernist design nerds. Needless to say, it's one of the city's true gems: While the Pool Room is a romantic spot for dinner, New York power lunches take place in the clubby, wood-paneled Grill Room. It's best for expense accounts: With its lofty prices and bustling location, it's usually packed with business types and Upper East Side denizens. And while it's an undeniably elegant space for an event, private rooms here are best reserved for big-deal celebrations like engagements or graduations.
Midtown
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