Travel

5th & 6th Arrondissement Kids

Kids neighborhood
Jardin Du Luxembourg
15 Rue de Vaugirard, 6th
Sure, this is home to some serious business (the French Senate occupies the adjacent Luxembourg Palace and the formal gardens are some of the city's prettiest), but this giant park really shines when it comes to occupying little kids. Children can expend copious amounts of energy here, whether it's by sailing model boats in the fountains, watching shows at the puppet theatre, riding donkeys on the vintage carousel, or working the jungle gym at the large enclosed playground.
5th & 6th Arrondissement
Le Jardin des Plantes
57 Rue Cuvier, 5th
First planted in 1635 as a medicinal herb garden by Guy de la Rousse, Louis XIII’s physician, these days Le Jardin des Plantes offers 69 sprawling acres of botanical gardens, scenic trails, and a natural history museum. The highlight, though, is a small zoo, which was founded in 1795, making it the second oldest in the world that’s still in existence (it’s outranked by Tiergarten Schönbrunn in Austria). Once home to animals from Versailles’ royal menagerie, the zoo is now known for its unusual, exotic (and often endangered) species.
5th & 6th Arrondissement
Musée National d’Histoire Naturelle
36 Rue Geoffroy-Saint-Hilaire, 5th
While the Jardins des Plantes’ Menagerie houses living endangered species (like red pandas and gaurs), its Natural History Museum houses taxidermy (like dodos and coelacanths), teaching kids and adults alike about the importance of conserving diverse animal life. Highlights include fossils and dinosaur skeletons in the Galerie de Paléontologie et d'Anatomie Comparée and meteorites in the Galerie de Minéralogie et de Géologie.
5th & 6th Arrondissement
Panthéon
Place du Panthéon, 5th
Modeled after the Pantheon in Rome, this giant mausoleum houses the remains of some of Paris's most famous citizens: Victor Hugo, Voltaire, Jean Monnet, Marie and Pierre Curie, Emile Zola, and as of 2002, Alexandre Dumas. And it was under the central dome that Léon Foucault constructed his pendulum to demonstrate the rotation of the earth (the original now lives in the Musée des Arts et Métiers). In 2007, Jacques Chirac dedicated a plaque in The Pantheon to the thousands of French citizens who harbored Jews during the German occupation, saving them from concentration camp internment.
5th & 6th Arrondissement
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