Food & Home

Photograph by Michelle Rose Photo for Because Mommy Matters

GOOP 15

Wide-Leg Trousers, Rare Plant Shops, and an American History Reckoning: What goop Staffers Are Talking about This Month

At goop, we’re always looking for perfect gifts to buy, great places to eat, and under-the-radar brands to shop. So when it comes to what’s new or the cool and obscure, we often turn to our coworkers for their advice and brilliant recommendations. Each month, we share the fifteen best things the goop team is currently obsessing over, including the books we’re reading, films we’re watching, and the voices we’re listening to.

1

(In)Visible Portraits

PORTRAIT MODE

“Black women’s stories need to be told, and I’ve been thinking about it more in the wake of Breonna Taylor’s killing. (In)Visible Portraits is a powerful documentary that celebrates Black women in America. While the documentary’s initial focus was to highlight Black mothers, first-time director Oge Egbuonu expanded the narrative into what it means to be a Black woman. She presents a new vision, one that captures the painful and powerful history of some of the most resilient and beautiful voices today.” —Amanda Chung, junior creative copywriter

(IN)VISIBLE PORTRAITS, available now on Vimeo On Demand

2

FOR OUR MAGIC

MAGIC IN MOTION

“Stress levels in the Twin Cities area may be sky-high right now, but For Our Magic cofounders Leeya Jackson and Safrat Shonibare won’t let being in financial and emotional survival mode keep Black people in the femme, queer, and trans communities from protecting their magic—that spark and glow that come from nurturing the body, recharging the spirit…and a really good eye-makeup palette. ‘We believe that Black folks deserve to survive as well as thrive,’ Jackson and Shonibare say of For Our Magic’s mission. ‘We know that folks impacted most financially and spiritually by COVID have been Black femme, queer, and trans folk.’ To make sure both wants and needs are being met, For Our Magic curates boxes stocked with self-care and beauty products from BIPOC-owned brands, then donates them to femme, queer, and trans BIPOC in the Twin Cities area. Every product in the box is either donated by or purchased from a BIPOC-owned beauty brand. On the site, brands can donate products, and White allies can make donations to help purchase products for the boxes and support a fund for financially impacted BIPOC in the beauty industry. To donate, nominate someone for a box, and share the initiative, check out For Our Magic online and on Instagram.” —Sarah Carr, associate editor

FOR OUR MAGIC

3

THE DEATH OF VIVEK OJI BY AKWAEKE EMEZI

NOVEL TIME

“I will tell anyone who will listen, and even people who won’t, to preorder this book before it comes out later this summer. Reading The Death of Vivek Oji is a vivid, propulsive experience, almost as if you were watching a movie on fast-forward. The story opens with the death of a teen named Vivek in a town in southeastern Nigeria. It moves through time and characters as you, the reader, try to put together Vivek’s life, death, hopes, worries, joys, and loves. It’s about loss, yes. But also about freedom and our capacity to imagine what it’s like to be someone else—or perhaps, more so, what it’s like to simply experience them as they are.” —Kiki Koroshetz, wellness director

THE DEATH OF VIVEK OJI BY AKWAEKE EMEZI, Bookshop, $24

4

POSTPARTUM PANTY Mommy Matters

MOM’S THE WORD

“Mommy Matters is the for-profit arm supporting Saving Mothers, a global charity that focuses on reducing maternal mortality rates in marginalized communities. Support by donating directly to Saving Mothers or by purchasing the mesh postpartum panties (the ice-pack pocket is brilliant) and pregnancy pillow. Also important to note: In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, Saving Mothers has redirected its efforts toward providing new mothers with essentials like formula, diapers, and disinfectant products.” —Alexis Antoniadis, social media manager

POSTPARTUM PANTY, Mommy Matters, $23

5

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: FROM EMANCIPATION TO THE PRESENT

LESSON PLAN

“Yale offers an African American history course on its website that is available to anyone who wants to understand this critical part of our country’s history. Or for anyone, like me, who needs a reeducation because what was taught to them in school was not nearly adequate. Professor Jonathan Holloway, PhD, an American historian and a former dean of Yale, covers emancipation to the present day, pulling from poems and texts, media, and images to answer the question: What does it mean to be a citizen? The lectures are available in video form and as written transcripts or audio recordings, if you want to treat it more like an article or a podcast (each lecture is around forty-five minutes). I’m excited to do the suggested reading, listen, and learn as much as I can.” —Leah Bedrosian, research scientist

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: FROM EMANCIPATION TO THE PRESENT, Yale University, free

6

THE DEEP

CURIOUS QUESTIONS

“A friend of mine recently turned me on to this new newsletter called The Deep. It calls itself a ‘questions company’ that wants to help people dive deeper, explore complex ideas, and have more meaningful conversations. The questions—like ‘Without your memories, who would you be?’ and ‘Can people fundamentally change?’—are designed to cultivate empathy and human connection, and there aren’t any right or wrong answers. As a company, The Deep is trying to do the opposite of what other brands do: It doesn’t try to tell you what to think; instead, the Deep asks, ‘What do you think?’ The messages aren’t frequent—they feel a bit mysterious—but they stay on my mind for days.” —Jessica Robinson, director, brand partnerships and marketing

THE DEEP

7

MINOR FEELINGS: AN ASIAN AMERICAN RECKONING BY CATHY PARK HONG

MINORITY REPORT

“I graduated twelve years ago with a degree in American literature. I read Nathanial Hawthorne, Ernest Hemingway, some Walt Whitman, lots of Emily Dickinson, and many more White ‘American’ voices. Minor Feelings is a thrilling and important new entry into this genre—Cathy Park Hong knits together untaught US history (with sources) and intimate accounts of her life as an immigrant child. I’ve never felt more seen. As the Black Lives Matter movement crescendos around us, I’ve been reflecting on the detrimental impact of the model minority myth. As Hong writes: ‘the model minority myth was popularized to keep Communists—and Black people—in check. Asian American success was circulated to promote capitalism and to undermine the credibility of Black civil rights…. There’s no discrimination, they assured us, as long as you’re compliant and hardworking.’ The history of BIPOC in America is twisted together and impossible to untangle. We’re one complex knot. Hong’s story is a challenge to American readers to step away from the solipsism of an often toxic Western lens and open up to the potential that what we learned in history class was intentionally abbreviated. This book should be required reading for all students of American literature because America is so much more than the White-lived experience. It’s painful, rich, and colorful. It’s sacred and human. It’s long overdue. And it’s time for a reckoning.” —Diana Ryu, chief of staff

MINOR FEELINGS: AN ASIAN AMERICAN RECKONING BY CATHY PARK HONG, Bookshop, $24

8

KAMALA AND MAYA’S BIG IDEA BY MEENA HARRIS

DARE TO DREAM

“This inspiring children’s book is written by the real-life niece and daughter of its main characters, Kamala and Maya Harris, respectively. It’s the story of two little girls with a big idea who never give up hope even after a bunch of grown-ups shut it down. With perseverance, creativity, and excellent organizational skills, the sisters make their idea into a reality that makes life better for their entire community. Kids will love it, and I promise you, parents will love reading it to them.” —Kate Wolfson, executive editor

KAMALA AND MAYA’S BIG IDEA BY MEENA HARRIS, Bookshop, $17

9

JOSE WIDE-LEG COTTON-BLEND CARGO TROUSERS

FANCY PANTS

“My love for casual cotton trousers is endless. I am always looking for a fresh pair. These from Wales Bonner—a London-based, primarily menswear designer—are going to be my go-to this summer. I love the subtle utility details and chic wide legs.” —Ali Pew, fashion director

JOSE WIDE-LEG COTTON-BLEND CARGO TROUSERS, Wales Bonner, $238

10

SANSO LOS ANGELES

POTS AND PLANTS

“Sanso—which is Korean for oxygen—is a beautiful ceramics studio and rare plant shop on the Eastside of LA. The ceramics are absolutely gorgeous: Think simple, clean lines and neutral hues, a minimalist’s dream. You can also mix and match the planters and bases. The rare plants are just as stunning—works of art in and of themselves. But I think a big part of what makes the shop so special is the people who work there. Every time I visit, I feel taken care of. The team is so knowledgeable and passionate about helping people grow and nurture their plants. In the past, I’ve gotten mixed messages about how best to keep your plants happy, but because of the staff’s expertise, all my Sanso babies are thriving. They are able to ship some of their ceramics and are working on making more pieces available online. Be sure to check out their Instagram for plenty of soothing plant inspiration.” —Cait Moore, senior programming manager

SANSO LOS ANGELES

11

LHC x HAAS BROTHERS COLLECTIBLE TIN AND CAKE

BAKE SALE

“After the sudden loss of her brother in 2018, my friend Liz Roth was forced to look inward and reevaluate. A lot of her personal growth came from baking at home. So when I saw Roth transform her kitchen into a cake factory in order to make a difference during COVID-19, I knew I had to support her. It’s my favorite type of cake (olive oil with a dust of powdered sugar), and 12 percent of the profit from each cake goes to a different charity each month, like Black Lives Matter Los Angeles and Covenant House California. Besides being insanely delicious—yes, I finished it in one afternoon—Roth has turned her bake-off into a charitable brand all in the name of the give-back. I’ll eat to that.” —Kelly Egarian, director of private clients

LHC x HAAS BROTHERS COLLECTIBLE TIN AND CAKE, Little House Confections, $88 (100 percent of the profits from this collaboration will go to the NAACP)

12

13TH, now streaming on Netflix

INCARCERATED NATION

“I just watched Ava DuVernay’s 13th (which was released in 2016). It’s one of those documentaries that stayed with me for days. Duvernay makes the powerful argument that mass incarceration is simply an extension of slavery. The documentary examines the Thirteenth Amendment and exposes why the American prison system is disproportionately filled with Black people. Her investigation of Reagan’s war on drugs, Bill Clinton’s 1994 crime bill, and mandatory sentencing laws reveals how detrimental these policies have been to people of color. It expertly links the past to the present, and we are faced with the fact that slavery is very much still alive and thriving in the form of the prison industrial complex, where privatized prisons profit from forced labor. My jaw was on the floor for the entire film. By the end, I was infuriated. I felt duped by what I thought I’d learned in school. This should be required watching.” —Justine Baldwin, editorial project manager

13TH, now streaming on Netflix

13

CARTIER WOMEN’S INITIATIVE

THE FUTURE IS FEMALE

“Cartier’s Women’s Initiative is a huge international business competition that supports social-impact-driven companies led and owned by female entrepreneurs. The CWI has not only granted millions of dollars and created thousands of jobs through its program; it’s also turned a spotlight on companies with great causes to support over the years. The program recently announced its winners for 2020, and they include Stephanie Benedetto with her New York–based company Queen of Raw. Benedetto’s mission is to combat waste: She created an online marketplace for businesses to buy and sell deadstock fabrics and textiles as a sustainable alternative to destroying them. I recommend checking out the other winners and their inspiring businesses—all socially conscious and, did I mention, female-founded?” —Sandra Slusarczyk, associate fashion editor

CARTIER WOMEN’S INITIATIVE

14

GLOW PACK by Goldthread

DRINK MORE PLANTS

“I’m hooked on the plant-based tonics from Goldthread. The founder of the company, William Siff, is a clinical herbalist, an ethnobotanist, and a licensed acupuncturist who wants to inspire people to drink more plants, so he created these drinks with only the good stuff: adaptogens, herbs, and spices. The flavors are tasty, and I love that you can get them in ‘power packs.’ The glow pack includes a green minerals drink with nettle leaf and chlorophyll, and it’s paired with a turmeric drink with ginger root and cinnamon chips. Goldthread also has great drink recipes on its Instagram.” —Samantha Saiyavongsa, assistant editor

GLOW PACK, Goldthread, $30 for a six-pack

15

YVONNE ORJI: MOMMA, I MADE IT!

COMEDY HOUR

“Any time spent reading about how much I loved Yvonne Orji’s new HBO comedy special Momma, I Made It! is time you could be spending 1) watching it, 2) laughing in a way you probably have not in a while, and 3) kicking off a vastly improved and more joyous hour of your life. Orji—you may know her from Insecure—is one of the greats. I would also definitely watch a spin-off show with her parents; I hope HBO gets on that.” —Jessie Geoffray, senior editor

YVONNE ORJI: MOMMA, I MADE IT!, now streaming on HBO

We hope you enjoy the products recommended here. Our goal is to suggest only things we love and think you might, as well. We also like transparency, so, full disclosure: We may collect a share of sales or other compensation if you purchase through the external links on this page.

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