Travel

Seattle Restaurants

Establishment neighborhood
Monsoon
615 19th Ave. E, Capitol Hill
Monsoon is actually a family-run Vietnamese restaurant, but they're known for a great dim sum brunch on Saturdays and Sundays (the menu includes an incredible Bloody Mary with pho broth). It's also the one Seattle dim sum spot on our list that wins points for decór—there's a bar with cool, sculptural wooden lanterns and a sunny rooftop patio in the summer. The dim sum menu is short and sweet, with steamed shrimp dumplings, lotus leaf sticky rice, and barbecue pork buns, plus a sampling of Vietnamese and Western brunch dishes, like drunken chicken with rice and a fried egg, steak and eggs with banana ketchup, and congee with roasted shitake mushrooms and a poached egg.
Jade Garden
424 7th Ave. S, Downtown
Not far from Harbor City (the other dim sum favorite in the International District), Jade Garden is a Seattle staple. The restaurant is actually really big, so while there's a line on the weekends, it moves fast, and you can use the time to look over the specials, which are written on an old-school chalkboard in gorgeous script, in English and Chinese. Try to snag a seat near the kitchen if possible—there are enough tables that folks in the back usually suffer from a smaller selection from the carts. Food-wise, they do classics like shumai and hum bow really well, and locals say the shrimp dumplings either fried or steamed are what they order late-night (it's open until 3am).
Harbor City
707 S. King St., Downtown
Set in the heart of Chinatown in the International District, with red lanterns hanging from the ceiling, lazy susan tables, and birds hanging in the windows, Harbor City is dim sum straight out of central casting. The space is pretty tiny, so we recommend arriving early on weekends to skip the lines. They do all the classics really well—the har gow, gai lan (steamed broccoli), pork siu mai, and barbecue pork buns all come highly recommended. If you're feeling adventurous enough to order some fried chicken feet, this is a good place to take the leap.
Bamboo Village
4900 Stone Way N, Wallingford
Probably the best thing about Bamboo Village, besides the fact that they do dim sum all day long, is that it doesn't get as crowded as the other dim sum spots in town. Read: You can always get a seat, and you won't be rushed through your meal, so you can do all the lingering (and deciding you want just one more dish) you like. Fan favorite dishes include the shumai, humbao, and fried taro from the dim sum menu, and regulars rave about the roasted duck with rice. And while it's definitely a love-it-or-hate-it kind of thing, taste-wise, it's more than worth ordering the mango jello with cream, which arrives shaped like a jiggling fish.
The London Plane
300 Occidental Ave. S, Downtown
The London Plane serves food all day in their café-style restaurant, offering an array of baked goods and sourdough toasts (e.g., curried avocado with radish, cabbage, and cilantro), as well as granolas, egg dishes, and veggie plates (like baby beets served with pomegranate and pistachio). Their dinner menu, which is available Wednesday through Saturday, includes mains like roasted chicken with wild mushrooms, strawberries, and hazelnuts. What makes The London Plane a bit different is that it's also part grocery and flower shop (overseen by Katherine Anderson of Marigold and Mint), so you can pick up specialty food items, gifts, floral arrangements, croissants to-go, all while brunching.
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