Travel

Washington

Establishment neighborhood
Marine Area 7
2814 E. Madison St., Madison Park
Local photographer Jim Henkens has an eye for finding beautifully weathered vintage kitchenware and props for shoots, so it’s only natural he’d turn his love of a treasure hunt into a brick-and-mortar shop. Tucked into Madison Park, Henkens’ buy expertly mixes old (vintage ironstone dishes, glass beakers) and new (linen dish towels, cookbooks, and earthware from Colombia) in a light-filled space you could easily spend the better part of an hour exploring. In the back of the store is a full kitchen, where he hosts a dinner series with guest chefs, Q&As with cookbook authors, and cooking classes.
[email protected] Seattle (Closed)
500 Pine St., Downtown
We’ve always been fans of Nordstrom, but now we have another big reason to stop by their recently renovated, OG downtown Seattle outpost: From May 12th through June 25th, goop is setting up a shop-in-shop inside. We’ve assembled a wellness-centric edit of best-selling clean beauty products, workout gear, dinner-simplifying cooking tools, and so much more—including essentials from our own family of house lines: goop by Juice Beauty skincare, closet basics from goop Label, goop Wellness vitamin and supplement regimens, plus goop Fragrance edition 02—shiso, which is crafted from gorgeous, natural ingredients (without any of the typical toxins). You can find [email protected] (furnished by 1stdibs) in seven other cities—including nearby Bellevue—plus a full expression online, through June 25.
Monsoon
615 19th Ave. E, Capitol Hill
Monsoon is actually a family-run Vietnamese restaurant, but they're known for a great dim sum brunch on Saturdays and Sundays (the menu includes an incredible Bloody Mary with pho broth). It's also the one Seattle dim sum spot on our list that wins points for decór—there's a bar with cool, sculptural wooden lanterns and a sunny rooftop patio in the summer. The dim sum menu is short and sweet, with steamed shrimp dumplings, lotus leaf sticky rice, and barbecue pork buns, plus a sampling of Vietnamese and Western brunch dishes, like drunken chicken with rice and a fried egg, steak and eggs with banana ketchup, and congee with roasted shitake mushrooms and a poached egg.
Jade Garden
424 7th Ave. S, Downtown
Not far from Harbor City (the other dim sum favorite in the International District), Jade Garden is a Seattle staple. The restaurant is actually really big, so while there's a line on the weekends, it moves fast, and you can use the time to look over the specials, which are written on an old-school chalkboard in gorgeous script, in English and Chinese. Try to snag a seat near the kitchen if possible—there are enough tables that folks in the back usually suffer from a smaller selection from the carts. Food-wise, they do classics like shumai and hum bow really well, and locals say the shrimp dumplings either fried or steamed are what they order late-night (it's open until 3am).
Harbor City
707 S. King St., Downtown
Set in the heart of Chinatown in the International District, with red lanterns hanging from the ceiling, lazy susan tables, and birds hanging in the windows, Harbor City is dim sum straight out of central casting. The space is pretty tiny, so we recommend arriving early on weekends to skip the lines. They do all the classics really well—the har gow, gai lan (steamed broccoli), pork siu mai, and barbecue pork buns all come highly recommended. If you're feeling adventurous enough to order some fried chicken feet, this is a good place to take the leap.
Bamboo Village
4900 Stone Way N, Wallingford
Probably the best thing about Bamboo Village, besides the fact that they do dim sum all day long, is that it doesn't get as crowded as the other dim sum spots in town. Read: You can always get a seat, and you won't be rushed through your meal, so you can do all the lingering (and deciding you want just one more dish) you like. Fan favorite dishes include the shumai, humbao, and fried taro from the dim sum menu, and regulars rave about the roasted duck with rice. And while it's definitely a love-it-or-hate-it kind of thing, taste-wise, it's more than worth ordering the mango jello with cream, which arrives shaped like a jiggling fish.
Milstead & Co.
754 N. 34th St., Fremont
Seattle has a reputation for seriously good coffee, in no small part due to the existence of connoisseurs like Andrew Milstead. His little spot in Fremont is a multi-roaster café, meaning the different roasts are switched out multiple times a day (folks in the coffee industry will tell you this is an art that’s difficult to master). Rest assured: While this spot is definitely a pilgrimage for coffee tourists, it’s equally welcoming to beginners—Milstead and his baristas are big on education and happy to answer questions.
Juicebox Café
1517 12th Ave., Capitol Hill
Less than a year after launching their cold-pressed juices, the first Juicebox retail space/café was opened in the fall of 2013 in Capitol Hill. The organic juices here are amazing, as are the salads. You can pop in to get food on the go, but the pretty café is the kind of place you want to hang with a girlfriend for brunch: The sunlit space is threaded with ivy plants and flowers, a collage of framed nature photographs decorates a wall above a perched bar counter, and on another wall, rustic white bookcases hold vintage bowls and plates.