Travel

Texas Services

Establishment neighborhood
Bell’Invito
147 Pittsburg St., Dallas
In Italian, Bell’Invito means “beautiful invitation.” The novelty of this company is that you can send out custom paper invites, but go through the entire process online (unless you opt for the couture line, which needs to be ordered in-person). Former fashion art director Heather Wiese spent a lot of time in Italy and fell in love with the artisanal quality of the stationery there. With Bell’Invito, she marries traditional craftsmanship with the demands of modern life. After customers fill out a detailed digital form that dictates the design, the stationery is made on a printing press dating back to the 1800s; the result is shipped within ten days of proof approval. Given that a three-month window is normally required for stationery of this caliber, the speedy turnaround is a lifesaver for time-starved planners.
Peaches
Kyle Branch is a young Dallas multihyphenate splitting his time between working at TenOverSix and creating unusual, retro-looking flower arrangements at Peaches. Oversize fronds and foliage dominate his arrangements, letting the flowers take a back seat. Branch—yes, that’s really his name—likes to break rules, playing with clashing colors, size, and scale so the arrangements spread far beyond the confines of the vase. This dichotomy works: Peaches’ pieces are a fabulous and unexpected addition to any event or tablescape.
Steve Visneau
Steven Visneau developed an appetite for photography as a child, habitually thumbing through his mother’s magazine collection. After a stint as a touring musician, Visneau purchased an old Nikon camera from a friend, started shooting, and never looked back. The photographer is comfortable capturing every situation—portraits, lifestyle shots, fashion editorial, you name it. But it’s Visneau’s images of the Texas Ballet Theater that are some of the most beautiful we’ve seen.
Stephen Karlisch
Steven Karlisch has been shooting weddings for close to twenty years. A childhood spent traveling with a photography-loving father piqued his interest, but it was only after a year studying architecture in college that Karlisch changed majors. While his wife was moonlighting as a photographer for a small wedding company, Karlisch decided to become a wedding photographer, and their photo studio flourished from there. His specialty is timeless, classic photography and the emotion behind the first look or the speeches. And he always tries to incorporate an architectural component, which lends dimension to his work. Karlisch is available to shoot both local and destination weddings.
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