Travel

Portugal

Establishment neighborhood
Shopping on Avenida de Liberdade
Avenida de Liberdade
What Rodeo Drive and Michigan Avenue are to Los Angeles and Chicago, Avenida de Liberdade is to Lisbon—except, because it's Lisbon, you'll get to soak in some beautiful 19-century architecture along the way. In addition to Gucci, Cartier, and Carolina Herrera—among many others—you'll also walk by Fashion Clinic (where you can find (Stella McCartney, Isabel Marant, Prada, etc.), located along the more than half-mile stretch, which connects Restauradores Square to Marquis of Pombal Square.
Bairro de Avillez
Rua Nova da Trindade, 18, Chiado
If you eat one place when you're in Portugal, make it Jose Avillez's thorough, Eataly-style restaurant complex in the São Carlos National Theatre in Chiado. In addition to a grocery with meats, cheeses, canned goods, and kitchen accessories, Bairro de Avillez is home to several notable sit-down restaurants, including Beco, a 1920's-style cabaret that features a prix fixe menu and live entertainment (for 18 and older, only), and Cantinho do Avillez, Avillez's modern take on traditional Portuguese food. Belcanto, the prix-fixe-menu spot that earned Avillez two Michelin stars, is just down the street.
Time Out Market
49 Av. 24 de Julho, Bairro Alto
This renovated market, part of Mercado da Ribeira, Lisbon's biggest fresh food market, has all the trappings of your typical food court—picnic-style community tables, food stalls, and large crowds—except the food itself is exceptional. It's a way to try a variety of dishes from a bunch of different top Portuguese chefs at once; there are thirty-five kiosks, with a not-to-be-missed spot from Henrique Sá Pessoa of Alma among them. Plus, there's ample outdoor seating on their adjacent terraces.
Cervejaria Ramiro
1 Av. Almirante Reis, Alfama
Known for serving some of the best seafood in Lisbon, the brightly lit Cervejaria Ramiro is always bustling with foodies—local and foreign alike—clamoring to try the restaurant's famous clams in garlic sauce, grilled giant tiger shrimp, and percebes (goose barnacles), among a host of other amazing options. While it may seem like you won't have room to try anything but the seafood, save some for their prego, a Portuguese steak sandwich—it's said to be the best in the city. Note: unsurprisingly, this place is pretty popular, so if you want to avoid the line (it's first-come, first-served), it's best to try for an early dinner.
Palácio Chiado
70 Rua do Alecrim, Bairro Alto
Entrepreneurs and brothers Duarte Cardoso Pinto and Gustavo and António Paulo Duarte bought Palácio Chiado in 2014, when the 18th-century palace sat in empty disrepair. Over the course of almost two years, they carefully restored the place, breathing new life into the gold-leaf chandeliers, elaborate frescoes and stucco work, and stained glass windows to make a home for their upscale food court program: A series of restaurants and bars spread out over the full two floors of the space. It's worth visiting for the building alone, but the food is deserving of the setting—we like Delisbon for exhaustively sourced charcuterie and cheese, and Local Chiado for locally sourced, veggie-forward quinoa bowls and sugar-free desserts. If you like fish, try Bacalhau Lisboa, a Portuguese spot that serves traditional iterations of codfish the same way it's been cooked here for generations. There's also a bar and a more formal restaurant for a sit-down dining experience.
The Mill
1 Rua do Poço dos Negros, Bairro Alto
The owners of this cozy modern café are Portuguese and Australian—and you can count on The Mill both for a great wine list, which rotates every few months, and also healthy breakfast fare like bircher muesli and avocado toast with poached eggs. The menu is designed around seasonal produce—and you can always stop by for fresh bagels, pastries, and excellent coffee. The staff is warm and helpful; it’s the kind of place you could stop in for a quick breakfast, or easily kill an entire afternoon.
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