Travel

Lisbon Restaurants

Establishment neighborhood
O Magano
R. Tomás da Anunciação 52A, Campo de Ourique
O Magano is a refined but still resolutely local spot (we were the only tourists in the place). Our chatty, intuitive server decided to skip the standard menu explanation and instead brought platters of what she figured we would like—cold seafood salad, bowls of chickpeas saturated in grassy green olive oil, and plenty of buttery rice. She guessed right. Pro tip: Reservations are essential, but make them late—no one eats before 8 p.m. in this town.
Bairro de Avillez
Rua Nova da Trindade, 18, Chiado
If you eat one place when you're in Portugal, make it Jose Avillez's thorough, Eataly-style restaurant complex in the São Carlos National Theatre in Chiado. In addition to a grocery with meats, cheeses, canned goods, and kitchen accessories, Bairro de Avillez is home to several notable sit-down restaurants, including Beco, a 1920's-style cabaret that features a prix fixe menu and live entertainment (for 18 and older, only), and Cantinho do Avillez, Avillez's modern take on traditional Portuguese food. Belcanto, the prix-fixe-menu spot that earned Avillez two Michelin stars, is just down the street.
Time Out Market
49 Av. 24 de Julho, Bairro Alto
This renovated market, part of Mercado da Ribeira, Lisbon's biggest fresh food market, has all the trappings of your typical food court—picnic-style community tables, food stalls, and large crowds—except the food itself is exceptional. It's a way to try a variety of dishes from a bunch of different top Portuguese chefs at once; there are thirty-five kiosks, with a not-to-be-missed spot from Henrique Sá Pessoa of Alma among them. Plus, there's ample outdoor seating on their adjacent terraces.
Cervejaria Ramiro
1 Av. Almirante Reis, Alfama
Known for serving some of the best seafood in Lisbon, the brightly lit Cervejaria Ramiro is always bustling with foodies—local and foreign alike—clamoring to try the restaurant's famous clams in garlic sauce, grilled giant tiger shrimp, and percebes (goose barnacles), among a host of other amazing options. While it may seem like you won't have room to try anything but the seafood, save some for their prego, a Portuguese steak sandwich—it's said to be the best in the city. Note: unsurprisingly, this place is pretty popular, so if you want to avoid the line (it's first-come, first-served), it's best to try for an early dinner.
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