Travel

The Hamptons Restaurants

Establishment neighborhood
Gosman’s Dock
500 W. Lake Dr., Montauk
At the entrance of Montauk Harbor, Gosman’s (which opened in 1943) epitomizes a kind of classic, unfussy seafood restaurant visitors have come to associate with the town. A bright, airy dining room looks out over passing fishing boats, and the menu is dominated by regional comfort food like Atlantic cod fish and chips, baked stuffed clams, steamed lobster, and Maryland-style crab cakes with a corn and jicama slaw. There’s also a walk-up window for those who don’t want a full sit-down meal, where you can order huge lobster rolls and plates of crisp, fried calamari to take to the water for an impromptu picnic.
Sam’s
36 Newtown Ln., East Hampton
The beauty of Sam's is its simplicity (not a word that’s often associated with the Hamptons). It’s an old school pizzeria in the best way, with a pine-paneled dining room and vinyl-covered booths where families cozy up to share classic thin crust pies. We love the Sam’s Special (sausage, onions, garlic, peppers, and mushrooms), though the pastas are worth a look, too, especially the rigatoni broccoli rabe in garlic and olive oil and the linguini with fresh, local clams. It’s right in the center of East Hampton, which means you can walk across the street to Scoop du Jour for ice cream after.
Il Mulino
108 Wainscott Stone Rd., Wainscott
Il Mulino has grown over the years from its original Greenwich Village location (which opened in 1981) to a mini culinary empire, with outposts in Miami and Las Vegas, five New York City spots, and, as of this summer, Wainscott. Regulars will recognize the menu’s familiar favorites—cacio e pepe risotto, garlicky linguine di mare, reliably great chicken parmigiano, and grilled branzino. The building—which has seen a few restaurants come and go—has been totally renovated, and the dining room now has a fresh whitewashed look a stone’s throw from Georgica Pond. Come hungry.
The Maidstone Restaurant
207 Main St., East Hampton
As part of the Maidstone's revamp a few summers back, the hotel brought in Chef David Strandridge (of Cafe Clover) to redo the breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus. Like at Standridge's West Village eatery, the menus are somehow both beautifully simple and very sophisticated. For breakfast, you'll find a balance of old-school comfort (whole grain avocado toast that can be ordered with lobster salad, egg in a hole, and a selection of smoothies) alongside more creative options, like the "nova," a smoked salmon dish with Greek yogurt, and an orange blossom pain perdue that's stewed in blackberries. Dinner, entirely worth booking even for non-hotel guests, is seafood-centric: lump crab cake, a local catch simply grilled, and black linguini with peekytoe crab, all with a side of old bay fries. Photos: Melissa Horn & Fran Parente
The Crow’s Nest Restaurant
4 Old W. Lake Dr., Montauk
Go to the Crow's Nest's restaurant for the same reason you'd stay at the hotel—the incredible atmosphere created by Sean McPherson's incredible eye. Indoors, the vibe is an eclectic mix of design pieces that still feels thoroughly Hamptons—whiteboard walls are decorated with earthy mud cloths and pirate flags, and Mediterranean mezze platters and hearty salads are served on warm wooden boards. If possible, book a table on their outdoor patio or—better yet—on the lawn, where four-tops are situated under elegant wooden cabanas.
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