Travel

Midtown

Establishment neighborhood
Salvation Burger (Closed)
230 E. 51st St., Midtown
April Bloomfield and Ken Friedman know a thing or two about burgers—if you’ve been to The Spotted Pig, their first venture, you know what we mean. For their newest, a restaurant inside the Pod 51 Hotel in Midtown East, they bet big on the classic, but the best version is veggie: It’s served with carrots and topped with a spicy masala. Heaven. The not-for-the-faint-of-heart menu has chili cheese fries, poutine, popcorn, beef jerky, and four types of pie—it’s kind of like fancy fast food, except that everything—mustard included—is made from scratch. Photos: Danielle Adams
Jeni’s (Closed)
600 11th Ave., Hell's Kitchen
This is the kind of ice cream shop that excels at slightly out of the ordinary, although not too outlandish, flavors: brambleberry crisp, churro, ylang ylang and fennel, Riesling poached pear sorbet, pink grapefruit buttermilk frozen yogurt. Jeni's started in Ohio, founded by Jeni Britton Bauer—James Beard award-winning author of Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home, and has since expanded to other cities. There are two shops in Chicago (Lakeview and Wicker Park), which are both outfitted with modern communal areas to perch with your cones, and which also sell Intelligentsia coffee. (On that note, you should try Jeni's Intelligentsia Black Cat Espresso ice cream.) On the West Coast, there is also a location in LA.
The Pennsy
2 Pennsylvania Plaza, Midtown
The cast of characters at Pennsy is surprisingly star-studded, all things considered. Vegetable lovers, as always, will appreciate the presence of The Little Beet, but the market is also home to The Cinnamon Snail, a brick-and-mortar version of the beloved vegan food truck, which serves the kinds of sandwiches that make veganism much more appealing. Lobster Press is there as well, Marc Forgione's take on a casual seafood spot, where the thing to order is the sandwich for which the cart was named—a hot lobster panini, pressed and served hot. There's something here for carnivores too, at Mario by Mary (a fast-casual Italian collaboration between Mario Batali and Mary Giuliani that promises excellent Italian sandwiches and muffalatas) and butcher Pat LaFrieda's first restaurant (order the filet mignon sandwich or the meatball sub). While that line-up is enough to garner a lot of regulars, La Colombe coffee really cinches the deal.
Ariston Floral Boutique
425 Lexington Ave., Midtown
Ariston is a great go-to florist for Manhattan flower deliveries. They have two locations, one in Chelsea and one in Midtown, and the website has a wide array of flowers and plants to choose from: Green cymbidium orchids mixed with hydrangea, peonies and callas, Bird of Paradise plants, and much more. Their bread and butter, though, is the kind of compact glass-vase arrangements that are particularly brilliant for brightening an office desk.
Ariston Floral Boutique
425 Lexington Ave., Midtown
Ariston is a great go-to florist for Manhattan flower deliveries. They have two locations, one in Chelsea and one in Midtown, and the website has a wide array of flowers and plants to choose from: Green cymbidium orchids mixed with hydrangea, peonies and callas, Bird of Paradise plants, and much more. Their bread and butter, though, is the kind of compact glass-vase arrangements that are particularly brilliant for brightening an office desk.
The Little Beet
320 Park Ave., Midtown
Ask someone with a gluten allergy about the Little Beet, and you're bound to get an earful of praise—the entire, delicious menu is celiac-friendly. Chef Franklin Becker was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was in his 20's and devoted the rest of his career to rebuilding his cooking style; the menu is full of light, healthy meals with an emphasis on lean protein and tons of vegetables. The seasonal menu items are always a sure bet, as are the make-your-own-plate options. There are also locations on 50th and at Penn Plaza.
Olde Good Things
149 Madison Ave., Midtown
Olde Good Things is a fantastic resource for high-end architectural salvage, which is sold as-is to be re-installed in new locations or repurposed into furniture and other décor items. Their New York showrooms in Midtown, Bowery, Union Square, and Chelsea (they also have one in LA) are jam-packed with period lighting, original doors, fireplace mantels, colorful stained glass, decorative iron, antique furniture, and more. For the most comprehensive view of their offerings, their website has a repository of all of the items in those showrooms and in their enormous Scranton, Pennsylvania warehouse.
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