Travel

New York City Shops

Establishment neighborhood
Parachute Home
129 Grand St., Soho
Inspired by the Italian linens she encountered on a trip to Amalfi several years ago, Parachute founder Ariel Kaye wanted to bring the same luxurious bedding to America. While the line started with bedding (the linen sheets are the only thing you’ll want to sleep in once you’ve tried them), the line has expanded to waffle bathrobes, Turkish towels, table linens, and throws. The New York flagship, which is set up like an apartment, with a living room, a functioning kitchen, a bedroom, and a vanity, pays homage to local artists, like Rodger Stevens, who designed the brass art installation in the entryway, and Brooklyn-based Rooted Design & Build, which created the natural wood table.
The Webster NYC
29 Greene St., Soho
While everyone else in fashion was developing e-commerce platforms, retail pioneer and French native Laure Hériard Dubreuil decided to open a 20,000-square-foot boutique, the Webster, in South Beach in a 1939 Henry Hohauser–designed Art Deco building. This initial flagship has since expanded to include locations in Bal Harbor, Houston, Costa Mesa, and most recently, New York's SoHo. Dubreuil is in good company, with Opening Ceremony and Apartment by The Line a hop, skip, and jump from her beautifully feminine, blush-hued store. You'll want everything, which is fine, as everything right down to the furniture is for sale. Designers are mixed together in the merchandising, meaning you need to search through the racks to hunt down a particular piece—this is all part of the fun. It also means you get to see everything and might pick up something you never knew you wanted until now.
Urban Jungle Vintage and Thrift
118 Knickerbocker Ave., Bushwick
A vintage-clothing mecca if there ever was one, Urban Jungle is huge and brimming with all manner of treasures: Perfectly tattered Levis, t-shirts and sweatshirts from the ‘80s and ‘90s so soft from wear and awesome that most NYC vintage stores would get away with charging a cool hundred for them (Here, most of the t-shirts go for under $12.) You’ll also find vibrant Mexican blankets, army fatigues, cowboy boots, ponchos, fur coats, everything and anything, really—and all inexplicably reasonably priced. The one criticism, if you can even call it that, is that the place is truly sprawling (it spans almost a whole block), so just make sure you’re in the mood to do some serious rack sifting.
Books Are Magic
225 Smith St., Cobble Hill
Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, and Boerum Hill residents were rightly bummed when one of the best independent bookstores in all the boroughs (and arguably the country) announced it was closing at the end of 2016. After thirty-five years in business, whatever was to come after BookCourt had big shoes to fill. And it did. Novelist Emma Straub (The Vacationers, Modern Lovers) swooped in with her husband, designer Michael Fusco-Straub, to open the immediately adored Books Are Magic. The monthly lineup of book talks and signings brings out the brightest of the literary world (of which Straub is a clear darling). If it’s your first time, take a picture by the awesome mural before you head inside.
Dimes Market
143 Division St., Chinatown
Conveniently located next door to the restaurant iteration of Dimes—if you're looking for the ingredients to recreate one of the bursting-with-flavor, health-centric dishes you've just consumed and can't stop thinking about, look no further. Dimes Market is a narrow, small but mighty, galley-style grocer, filled with all the provisions one needs to churn out delicious meals, snacks, and smoothies from the average tiny NYC kitchen (or if you're no home-cook, make your kitchen look pretty instead with the selection of linens, ceramics, and premium-grade olive oil also lining the shelves). A tight edit of only-the-best food purveyors, quality produce, all manner of powders and supplements, pretty utensils and, last, but not least, clean beauty products fill the space. Dimes market is the modern apothecary for the thoroughly modern shopper—because sometimes we need to pick up a side of aluminum-free deodorant alongside that bunch of greens and crate of grapefruit La Croix.
Dr. Cow
93 S. 6th St., Williamsburg
Home to our all-time favorite golden milk (it’s thick and rich, almost like hot chocolate, perfectly balanced...insane), this tiny shop also makes some of the most incredible aged-cashew cheese we’ve ever had. Everything Argentinian couple Veronica Schwartz and Pablo Castro make is vegan, dairy-free, gluten-free, and soy-free, from granola, tarts, and bon bons to the cheeses, plus they stock a an amazing selection of adaptogens from goop Shop favorite Sun Potion.
The Alchemist’s Kitchen
21 E. 1st St., East Village
Part holistic café, part beauty and wellness boutique, The Alchemist’s Kitchen has everything from delicious matcha milkshakes and an array of beautifully health-supporting detox teas to adaptogenic mushroom powders (Sun Potion galore!) elixirs for sweet dreams, the best ghee butter on the planet, and tinctures for every ailment under the sun (menstrual cramps, stress, and more). Founded by three female herbalists, the studio offers workshops and informative panels on herbalism and the healing powers of botanicals, as well as one-on-one consultations with their in-house herbalists. (Bonus: Infrared studio Higher Dose shares the space, occupying the lower level.)
Roman and Williams Guild
53 Howard St., Soho
Roman and Williams's first brick-and-mortar location spotlights its Founding Collection—furniture, lighting, and accessories created by the husband and wife duo Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch—and collaborations with global artisans, found objects, and antiques. From the glossy custom grey paint to the open shelving showcasing French and Japanese artisan glassware, every detail in the space is considered and exudes the signature striking-meets-livable Roman and Williams style, as seen in spaces like New York's Ace Hotel, San Antonio's Hotel Emma, and Freehand Chicago (Roman and Williams are also the geniuses behind goop Lab's design). Standefer and Alesch wanted the space to reflect the way they live, so they incorporated La Mercerie, an all-day Parisian café and bakery (open until 11 p.m.), and flower shop from "local muse of botany" Emily Thompson. The result is a gorgeously luxurious, utterly authentic space we never want to leave.
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