Travel

New York Shops

Establishment neighborhood
Hill House Home
395 Bleecker St., West Village
Occupying the ground floor of a West Village townhouse, Hill House Home packs a real punch: Prepare yourself for a lot of blue and white palm trees. Nell Diamond, the bedding line’s founder, collaborated with Martin Brûlé of Martin Brûlé Studio to do the entire room in an eccentric, nineteenth-century fabric that Brûlé found at a flea market in Paris. The 500-square-foot-space feels a little like stumbling upon a grand European hotel (or the set of a Wes Anderson movie), with white lacquered furnishings and Hill House Home’s crisp, white bedding as the focal point. Don’t miss the wall of mini pillows—which make great gifts—each one embroidered with a playful phrase, like “5 More Minutes.”
HATCH
17 Bleecker St., Soho
Ariane Goldman had her lightbulb moment five years ago when she was pregnant with her daughter and couldn’t find many fashionable options for her growing size. Her months of searching resulted in Hatch, an easy-to-wear line geared toward mothers before, during, and postpregnancy. There are staples, like a striped bateau and chambray tops, as well as special pieces, like the Noa Jumper, a versatile linen jumpsuit with adjustable knotted straps, and the Ziggy Pant, which features a stitched smocked waistband to accommodate an expanding waist. Dressing rooms have a size chart to help you figure out how a piece might fit, depending on where you are in your pregnancy and—best yet—there’s a cravings bar stocked with candy, pickles, you name it.
Parachute Home
129 Grand St., Soho
Inspired by the Italian linens she encountered on a trip to Amalfi several years ago, Parachute founder Ariel Kaye wanted to bring the same luxurious bedding to America. While the line started with bedding (the linen sheets are the only thing you’ll want to sleep in once you’ve tried them), the line has expanded to waffle bathrobes, Turkish towels, table linens, and throws. The New York flagship, which is set up like an apartment, with a living room, a functioning kitchen, a bedroom, and a vanity, pays homage to local artists, like Rodger Stevens, who designed the brass art installation in the entryway, and Brooklyn-based Rooted Design & Build, which created the natural wood table.
The Webster NYC
29 Greene St., SoHo
While everyone else in fashion was developing e-commerce platforms, retail pioneer and French native Laure Hériard Dubreuil decided to open a 20,000-square-foot boutique, the Webster, in South Beach in a 1939 Henry Hohauser–designed Art Deco building. This initial flagship has since expanded to include locations in Bal Harbor, Houston, Costa Mesa, and most recently, New York's SoHo. Dubreuil is in good company, with Opening Ceremony and Apartment by The Line a hop, skip, and jump from her beautifully feminine, blush-hued store. You'll want everything, which is fine, as everything right down to the furniture is for sale. Designers are mixed together in the merchandising, meaning you need to search through the racks to hunt down a particular piece—this is all part of the fun. It also means you get to see everything and might pick up something you never knew you wanted until now.
Urban Jungle Vintage and Thrift
118 Knickerbocker Ave., Bushwick
A vintage-clothing mecca if there ever was one, Urban Jungle is huge and brimming with all manner of treasures: Perfectly tattered Levis, t-shirts and sweatshirts from the ‘80s and ‘90s so soft from wear and awesome that most NYC vintage stores would get away with charging a cool hundred for them (Here, most of the t-shirts go for under $12.) You’ll also find vibrant Mexican blankets, army fatigues, cowboy boots, ponchos, fur coats, everything and anything, really—and all inexplicably reasonably priced. The one criticism, if you can even call it that, is that the place is truly sprawling (it spans almost a whole block), so just make sure you’re in the mood to do some serious rack sifting.
Books Are Magic
225 Smith St., Cobble Hill
Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, and Boerum Hill residents were rightly bummed when one of the best independent bookstores in all the boroughs (and arguably the country) announced it was closing at the end of 2016. After thirty-five years in business, whatever was to come after BookCourt had big shoes to fill. And it did. Novelist Emma Straub (The Vacationers, Modern Lovers) swooped in with her husband, designer Michael Fusco-Straub, to open the immediately adored Books Are Magic. The monthly lineup of book talks and signings brings out the brightest of the literary world (of which Straub is a clear darling). If it’s your first time, take a picture by the awesome mural before you head inside.
2 Note
255 Warren St., Hudson Valley
The folks at 2 Note, a local apothecary that takes inspiration from both music and nature, will do everything from steer you in the direction of a hydrating face oil to help you choose one of their botanical fragrances. The small line of perfumes and bath and body care products are all crafted in small batches, meaning each one is mixed, bottled, and labeled by hand. (Test drive their goods in the rooms at Rivertown Lodge.) For kiddos, there's a line called Piccolo, which includes a gentle body wash, baby powder, and a do-everything balm that's packed with essential oils.
Variety Valley
705 Warren St., Hudson
After seventeen years in SF, Chuck Rosenthal fell in love with Hudson and decided to buy the building that now occupies Valley Variety. (He lives on the third floor.) Here, he curates a lifestyle shop, which features Arita porcelain, Normann Copenhagen pendants, Bensen seating, and much more. It's the kind of spot you'll wander into, think you don't need another thing, and wind up with, say, a set of Scandinavian spice grinders. A bonus: They host regular (and private) cooking demonstrations with local and visiting chefs, covering topics like family-centric cooking, Korean BBQ, and even a knish night.
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