Travel

8th Arrondissement

Establishment neighborhood
Le Relais de l’Entrecôte
15 Rue Marbeuf, 8th
You know exactly what to expect at this, kitschy, family-owned establishment and that's the best steak frites in town topped with buttery, herby “secret” sauce. That’s it, and it’s worth lining up for at this is a no-reservations locale. Touristy though it may be—they’ve since opened locations in London and New York—it remains a local’s mainstay, too, as proof of its great quality. There are now locations in the 5th 6th
L’Eclaireur
26 Ave. Champs-Elysées, 8th
There are very few boutiques that fully embody an aesthetic, but L’Eclaireur does this perfectly—no small feat, considering there are seven very distinct shops scattered around the city, as well as a bar/restaurant that doubles as a shrine to Piero Fornasetti. Armand and Martine Hadida’s original outpost in 1980 was incredibly important for a number of reasons, most notably because L’Eclaireur was the first to break brands like Prada, Helmut Lang, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela in France. While the Hadidas have had every opportunity to rest on their laurels, the pace has been relentless ever since as they’ve continued to ferret out the world’s best new talent, in fashion, in jewelry, and in home goods. While the mix at every spot varies, we like the moodily gothic Place des Victoires location best. Under the light cast by a strange and fantastic bird chandelier, you’ll find Fornasetti umbrella stands, chunky chain link bracelets from Mawi, cashmere travel wraps by Denis Colombe, and coated Saint Laurent skinny jeans. If time allows, their most recent project shouldn’t be missed, either: They’ve taken a space in Habitat 1964’s vintage village at…
L’Eclaireur
39 Ave. Hoche, 8th
There are very few boutiques that fully embody an aesthetic, but L’Eclaireur does this perfectly—no small feat, considering there are seven very distinct shops scattered around the city, as well as a bar/restaurant that doubles as a shrine to Piero Fornasetti. Armand and Martine Hadida’s original outpost in 1980 was incredibly important for a number of reasons, most notably because L’Eclaireur was the first to break brands like Prada, Helmut Lang, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela in France. While the Hadidas have had every opportunity to rest on their laurels, the pace has been relentless ever since as they’ve continued to ferret out the world’s best new talent, in fashion, in jewelry, and in home goods. While the mix at every spot varies, we like the moodily gothic Place des Victoires location best. Under the light cast by a strange and fantastic bird chandelier, you’ll find Fornasetti umbrella stands, chunky chain link bracelets from Mawi, cashmere travel wraps by Denis Colombe, and coated Saint Laurent skinny jeans. If time allows, their most recent project shouldn’t be missed, either: They’ve taken a space in Habitat 1964’s vintage village at…
L’Eclaireur
10 Rue Boissy d'Anglas, 8th
There are very few boutiques that fully embody an aesthetic, but L’Eclaireur does this perfectly—no small feat, considering there are seven very distinct shops scattered around the city, as well as a bar/restaurant that doubles as a shrine to Piero Fornasetti. Armand and Martine Hadida’s original outpost in 1980 was incredibly important for a number of reasons, most notably because L’Eclaireur was the first to break brands like Prada, Helmut Lang, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela in France. While the Hadidas have had every opportunity to rest on their laurels, the pace has been relentless ever since as they’ve continued to ferret out the world’s best new talent, in fashion, in jewelry, and in home goods. While the mix at every spot varies, we like the moodily gothic Place des Victoires location best. Under the light cast by a strange and fantastic bird chandelier, you’ll find Fornasetti umbrella stands, chunky chain link bracelets from Mawi, cashmere travel wraps by Denis Colombe, and coated Saint Laurent skinny jeans. If time allows, their most recent project shouldn’t be missed, either: They’ve taken a space in Habitat 1964’s vintage village at…
Lachaume
103 Rue Faubourg St. Honoré, 8th
Only in Paris would you find a florist's shop that's operated for over a century—Lachaume is the oldest in town. Proust was a fan back in the day, while today it's Karl Lagerfeld who sings its praises. At their upscale address on Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré, Caroline and Stephanie, who took over from their grandmother, continue her tradition while working with local producers to create bouquets that are much more attuned to the seasons. They're also known for their dramatic, long-stemmed arrangements, and their incredible selection—they even have exclusives on certain varieties.
Azzedine Alaïa
5 Rue de Marignan, 8th
Famous for his body-conscious dresses and sky-high stilettos, the Tunisian-born Azzedine Alaïa is pretty much synonyous with sex appeal. You can expect it in spades at his new brand-new three-story shop, which is housed in an 18th century mansion just steps from Avenue Montaigne. The main floor is devoted to accessories, while his ready-to-wear spans across the next two levels. It's all artfully arranged in the spare and graphic space, which never competes with the clothes: After all, when it comes to an Alaïa, you don't need much else. While the barely marked Rue de Marignan shop is our favorite, there's a stock shop around the corner from the location on Rue de Moussy, which sells pieces from the previous seasons at lower prices.
Chez Savy
23 Rue Bayard, 8th
Situated right off the Avenue Montaigne, this tiny bistro is laid out like an old-school dining car with cozy booths, vintage luggage racks, and mirrored walls in lieu of windows. As for the rest of the decor, expect to see lots of original Art Deco elements (stained glass, frieze ceiling) left over from a time when Savy was a Jazz Age hotspot. The cuisine is traditional French (foie gras, lentil soup, andouillette sausage) and the portions are generous.
Ladurée
75 Ave. des Champs Elysées, 8th
Thanks to loads of press and a swift global expansion in 2005 (there are now outposts in New York, London, Lebanon, Japan, Sweden, Hong Kong, Brazil, etc.), the Ladurée celadon green is almost as iconic as Tiffany’s robin’s egg blue, or Hermes’ orange: It all started in 1862 at 16 rue Royale, when writer Louis Ernest Ladurée opened a pastry shop. Though macaroons had been kicking around France since the 16th century, when Catherine de Medici introduced them from Italy, Ladurée’s grandson revolutionized the concept in 1930 by using a bit of ganache to create a macaron sandwich. That said, their dinner service is great, with a kid-friendly menu that adults can enjoy too.
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