Travel

8th & 16th Arrondissement Shops

Establishment neighborhood
L’Eclaireur
26 avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8th
There are very few boutiques that fully embody an aesthetic, but L’Eclaireur does this perfectly—no small feat, considering there are seven very distinct shops scattered around the city, as well as a bar/restaurant that doubles as a shrine to Piero Fornasetti. Armand and Martine Hadida’s original outpost in 1980 was incredibly important for a number of reasons, most notably because L’Eclaireur was the first to break brands like Prada, Helmut Lang, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela in France. While the Hadidas have had every opportunity to rest on their laurels, the pace has been relentless ever since as they’ve continued to ferret out the world’s best new talent, in fashion, in jewelry, and in home goods. While the mix at every spot varies, we like the moodily gothic Place des Victoires location best. Under the light cast by a strange and fantastic bird chandelier, you’ll find Fornasetti umbrella stands, chunky chain link bracelets from Mawi, cashmere travel wraps by Denis Colombe, and coated Saint Laurent skinny jeans. If time allows, their most recent project shouldn’t be missed, either: They’ve taken a space in Habitat 1964’s vintage village at…
L’Eclaireur
39 Avenue Hoche, 8th
There are very few boutiques that fully embody an aesthetic, but L’Eclaireur does this perfectly—no small feat, considering there are seven very distinct shops scattered around the city, as well as a bar/restaurant that doubles as a shrine to Piero Fornasetti. Armand and Martine Hadida’s original outpost in 1980 was incredibly important for a number of reasons, most notably because L’Eclaireur was the first to break brands like Prada, Helmut Lang, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela in France. While the Hadidas have had every opportunity to rest on their laurels, the pace has been relentless ever since as they’ve continued to ferret out the world’s best new talent, in fashion, in jewelry, and in home goods. While the mix at every spot varies, we like the moodily gothic Place des Victoires location best. Under the light cast by a strange and fantastic bird chandelier, you’ll find Fornasetti umbrella stands, chunky chain link bracelets from Mawi, cashmere travel wraps by Denis Colombe, and coated Saint Laurent skinny jeans. If time allows, their most recent project shouldn’t be missed, either: They’ve taken a space in Habitat 1964’s vintage village at…
L’Eclaireur
10 rue Boissy d'Anglas, 8th
There are very few boutiques that fully embody an aesthetic, but L’Eclaireur does this perfectly—no small feat, considering there are seven very distinct shops scattered around the city, as well as a bar/restaurant that doubles as a shrine to Piero Fornasetti. Armand and Martine Hadida’s original outpost in 1980 was incredibly important for a number of reasons, most notably because L’Eclaireur was the first to break brands like Prada, Helmut Lang, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela in France. While the Hadidas have had every opportunity to rest on their laurels, the pace has been relentless ever since as they’ve continued to ferret out the world’s best new talent, in fashion, in jewelry, and in home goods. While the mix at every spot varies, we like the moodily gothic Place des Victoires location best. Under the light cast by a strange and fantastic bird chandelier, you’ll find Fornasetti umbrella stands, chunky chain link bracelets from Mawi, cashmere travel wraps by Denis Colombe, and coated Saint Laurent skinny jeans. If time allows, their most recent project shouldn’t be missed, either: They’ve taken a space in Habitat 1964’s vintage village at…
Azzedine Alaïa
5 Rue de Marignan, 8th
Famous for his body-conscious dresses and sky-high stilettos, the Tunisian-born Azzedine Alaïa is pretty much synonyous with sex appeal. You can expect it in spades at his new brand-new three-story shop, which is housed in an 18th century mansion just steps from Avenue Montaigne. The main floor is devoted to accessories, while his ready-to-wear spans across the next two levels. It's all artfully arranged in the spare and graphic space, which never competes with the clothes: After all, when it comes to an Alaïa, you don't need much else. While the barely marked Rue de Marignan shop is our favorite, there's a stock shop around the corner from the location on Rue de Moussy, which sells pieces from the previous seasons at lower prices.
Christian Louboutin
68 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, 8th
Sure, you’ll find Christian Louboutin’s full range of red-soled stilettos and studded loafers here, but you’ll also find unparalleled customer service. They maintain a strict 1:1 ratio of salespeople to clients, and while this might seem like it would result in helicopter-like hovering, it doesn’t. Instead, they swoop in only when you have a question or need a size. There are two other locations, including one in the 1st and one in the 7th.
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