Travel

5th Arrondissement

Establishment neighborhood
Le Zyriab at the Institut du Monde Arabe
1 Rue des Fossés St. Bernard, 5th
Le Zyriab, part of a chain of Lebanese restaurants in France, is nothing fancy, but the stunning views from atop the Institut du Monde Arabe set this place apart for drinks overlooking the Seine and the Ile St. Louis. Aside from being inside one of the finest cultural institutions in Paris, it's also never too busy in the afternoons before dinner, making it a standby for getting the evening started over a couple of glasses of Lebanese wine, which is actually pretty good.
Le Jardin des Plantes
57 Rue Cuvier, 5th
First planted in 1635 as a medicinal herb garden by Guy de la Rousse, Louis XIII’s physician, these days Le Jardin des Plantes offers 69 sprawling acres of botanical gardens, scenic trails, and a natural history museum. The highlight, though, is a small zoo, which was founded in 1795, making it the second oldest in the world that’s still in existence (it’s outranked by Tiergarten Schönbrunn in Austria). Once home to animals from Versailles’ royal menagerie, the zoo is now known for its unusual, exotic (and often endangered) species.
Le Jardin des Plantes
57 Rue Cuvier, 5th
First planted in 1635 as a medicinal herb garden by Guy de la Rousse, Louis XIII’s physician, these days Le Jardin des Plantes offers 69 sprawling acres of botanical gardens, scenic trails, and a natural history museum. The highlight, though, is a small zoo, which was founded in 1795, making it the second oldest in the world that’s still in existence (it’s outranked by Tiergarten Schönbrunn in Austria). Once home to animals from Versailles’ royal menagerie, the zoo is now known for its unusual, exotic (and often endangered) species.
Shakespeare and Company
37 Rue de la Bûcherie, 5th
This just might be the best bookstore in the world. It has the vibe of a warren-like country home rather than a straightforward shop, books are piled haphazardly from floor to ceiling (many of which are in English), there are benches dotted here and there, and it's staffed mostly by college kids who are full of great recommendations. It’s also home to a rich literary history—over the years, Shakespeare and Company has played host to famous American writers like Allen Ginsberg, Ernest Hemingway, William Burroughs, and William Styron. Founder George Whitman (the shop is now run by his daughter, Sylvia) famously opened up the shop’s cozy benches and couches to artists and writers who needed a place to stay. Many of these drifting creatives—or tumbleweeds, as they became known—went on to become important literary figures in their own right.
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