Travel

Paris Kids

Establishment neighborhood
Chez Savy
23 Rue Bayard, 8th
Situated right off the Avenue Montaigne, this tiny bistro is laid out like an old-school dining car with cozy booths, vintage luggage racks, and mirrored walls in lieu of windows. As for the rest of the decor, expect to see lots of original Art Deco elements (stained glass, frieze ceiling) left over from a time when Savy was a Jazz Age hotspot. The cuisine is traditional French (foie gras, lentil soup, andouillette sausage) and the portions are generous.
Les Cocottes
135 Rue St. Dominique, 7th
The only thing that outshines Les Cocottes’s brilliant use of glass jars and Staub cast iron cocottes, is the menu itself. Chef Christian Constant has developed a robust offering of salads (a non-traditional Ceasar salad), soups (pumpkin, seafood bisque), and mains (ratatouille, langoustine ravioli) that satisfy without breaking the bank. And then of course there’s Constant’s famous chocolate tart. Those who fly by the seat of their pants will appreciate the no-reservations policy: Even though there’s always a wait. That’s ok, because it’s conveniently located near the Jardin du Luxembourg and Eiffel Tower.
Nanashi
31 Rue de Paradis, 10th
Rose Bakery alum Kaori Endo’s creative spin on traditional, Japanese bento boxes is a huge hit in Paris—and she has a mini-chainlet of restaurants to prove it. We like the Marais location best, as its bigger than her original spot in the 10th. There’s a grocery and takeaway in the front, and a handful of tables in the back, where you can feast on really beautiful plates of veggies, carefully prepared meat and fish, chirashis, and soup. There's another location in the 3rd.
Nanashi
57 Rue Charlot, 3rd
Rose Bakery alum Kaori Endo’s creative spin on traditional, Japanese bento boxes is a huge hit in Paris—and she has a mini-chainlet of restaurants to prove it. We like the Marais location best, as its bigger than her original spot in the 10th. There’s a grocery and takeaway in the front, and a handful of tables in the back, where you can feast on really beautiful plates of veggies, carefully prepared meat and fish, chirashis, and soup. There is also another location in the 10th.
Ladurée
75 Ave. des Champs Elysées, 8th
Thanks to loads of press and a swift global expansion in 2005 (there are now outposts in New York, London, Lebanon, Japan, Sweden, Hong Kong, Brazil, etc.), the Ladurée celadon green is almost as iconic as Tiffany’s robin’s egg blue, or Hermes’ orange: It all started in 1862 at 16 rue Royale, when writer Louis Ernest Ladurée opened a pastry shop. Though macaroons had been kicking around France since the 16th century, when Catherine de Medici introduced them from Italy, Ladurée’s grandson revolutionized the concept in 1930 by using a bit of ganache to create a macaron sandwich. That said, their dinner service is great, with a kid-friendly menu that adults can enjoy too.
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