Travel

Mayfair

Establishment neighborhood
Lanserhof at the Arts Club
17-18 Dover St., Mayfair
Several goop staffers are longtime fans of the Lanserhof’s clinic in Austria. So we were delighted when they opened their first UK clinic, across the street from the Arts Club in Mayfair. The custom-tailored programs at this medical spa and gym marry time-honored holistic treatments with modern medicine. Arts Club members and Lanserhof patients can avail themselves of the top-notch facilities that include Britain’s first cryotherapy chambers, treatment rooms for sports injuries, diagnostics with the clinic’s doctors, and a thoughtfully crafted menu of healthy food to tuck into post-treatment.
The House of Elemis
2 Lancashire Court, Mayfair
Each floor of this renovated townhouse seems more luxurious, calming, and super-indulgent than the next. The treatment packages are especially amazing if you have an afternoon to spare; if not, The Speed Spa offers 15-minute and 30-minute services like eye facials, firming facials, and massages—all of them fantastic. The spa’s Penthouse is even more luxe: A spa concierge arranges your entire experience, from a door-to-door chauffeur to tickets for a post-treatment show or restaurant reservations.
Matchesfashion Townhouse
5 Carlos Place, Mayfair
Six meticulously restored floors of a Georgian townhouse filled with fashion is the latest venture from the UK luxury retailer, Matches. Directly across from the Connaught Hotel, the store takes the shopping experience up a notch with a service that lets you choose—from the office, a cab, the airport, wherever—what you want to try on before you get there. All the loot is waiting in a fitting room with your name on it when you arrive. Matches is also breathing life into the space beyond the merchandise, with evening talks and workshops, a café space with rotating chefs, and a gorgeous tropical-themed garden to catch your breath.
Lyndsey Ingram
20 Bourdon St., Mayfair
London is so packed with incredible galleries and cultural institutions that it’s daunting to know even where to begin. Which is why we’d point you here. Lynsey Ingram’s tiny gallery is almost hidden down Bourdon Street, but once you find it, you’ll discover an exciting collection of post-war prints from artists like Francis Bacon, Will Cotton, and Peter Doig. Ingram worked for Sotheby’s for years before going it alone, and her knowledge and eye is evident here. And aside from the art, it’s stocked with catalogues and comfy chairs, and Ingram herself is usually on hand for any questions about the works you find most interesting.
Métier
59 S. Audley St., Mayfair
Founder and designer Melissa Morris (who cut her teeth at Belstaff), spent years researching, sourcing, and designing her beautifully made Italian leather bags. Aside from the luggage, we love the smaller pieces, too, like the card-holders and leather clutches with compartments for phones, money and iPads. The boutique on South Audley street feels like being in a mahogany-clad library and is always a treat to pop in for a bit of peace and quiet while browsing the goods.
Jessica McCormack
7 Carlos Pl., Mayfair
On a corner of Carlos Place—arguably the most sublime shopping street in Mayfair—is McCormack’s atelier. The three-floor townhouse is filled with such beautiful furniture and art collection that you forget you’re there for the jewels. Until you see them: necklaces of cascading diamonds, Art Deco drop earrings, and engagement rings galore. And McCormack excels at breathing new life into family heirloom rings by creating modern “jackets” of jewels to surround the older piece to make it wearable for modern styles. An appointment here might involve relaxing on the sofas upstairs, flipping through the dozens of art and photography books stacked elegantly on the shelves for reference, or chatting with the designer about what your aesthetic preferences. McCormack considers herself a family jeweler, which is fair given that once you’ve ordered a piece, you’re likely to continue going back. The entire experience is bespoke, elegant and thoughtful.
Dukes Bar
35 St. James's Pl., Mayfair
A well-made martini is hard to come by, and for this alone, Dukes Hotel Bar merits a visit. This quintessentially British bar is an elegant affair and a perfect spot to decompress in Mayfair. Have a seat at one of the tables and take in the hushed civility around you—portraits of notable Brits, prints of city landmarks. In a few minutes, a bartender in a starched white jacket will come by with the martini trolley and mix the cocktail to your exact specifications. It’s ideal for a calm drink with your parents (the cigar and Cognac garden helps), or come alone, sit at the bar, and enjoy the indulgence of a perfectly mixed drink, just because.
Sabor
35-37 Heddon St., Mayfair
Heddon Street is the closest thing Mayfair has to a back alley—and nipping down the side street for a feast of full suckling pig and one too many glasses of fine sherry feels suitably illicit. Sabor is flavor—and lots of it. The two-story space cheerily decked out in Spanish tile and exposed brick hits the sweet spot of having both the dip-in-and-out cozy seats at the bar for a few tapas and the communal table packed with your rambunctious extended family for several courses upstairs. From the same people behind Barrafina, the traditional food here is good, really good. Grilled bread with a scraping of smashed tomato; oily, garlicky prawns to tear into with your fingers; and a whole suckling pig (it comes in a half or quarter sizes, too) so meltingly tender it arrives with only a spoon to serve.
Sake No Hana
23 St. James's St., Mayfair
Sake No Hana turns out some of the best sushi in London. The Kengo Kuma–designed restaurant is an interpretation of what a forest of the future might look like: The ceiling and walls are made of interlocking bamboo and cypress tree rods, warmed up with the reflective glow of the amber lighting, like the sun peeping through the pines. This is a proper restaurant that has not succumbed to too-noisy, too-dark clubbiness. Sit at the bar to watch the chefs at work, and if in doubt, go for the tasting menu for Sake No Hana’s greatest hits, all beautifully presented. Skip the traditional desserts and get the Japanese whiskey flight—three tasters, each one accompanied by a lone chocolate that complements the flavors. Dining here, while undoubtedly a commitment, is worth every penny: The food is exquisite and the service faultless.
Ikoyi
1 St. James's Market, Mayfair
Ikoyi is named for the swish Lagos neighborhood cofounder Iré Hassan-Odukale grew up in. The cooked-to-perfection West African fare is prepared by Hassan-Odukale’s school friend, Chinese-Canadian chef Jeremy Chan. Chan, who hails from the kitchens of Noma and Dinner, and Hassan-Odukale have put a great deal of thought into every detail, from the incredibly sleek, almost mid-century modern dining room to the unusual and fascinating cocktail list. Then again, this is St. James's—there is no room for error. Order the suya beef blade with rich, smoked bone marrow and jollof rice, get a side of the sweet buttermilk plantain, and if nothing else, order the Guinness Stone Fence. Guinness is popular in Nigeria, and this cocktail, with cacao-nib-infused rum and lime flower, elevates the humble pint to a sublime creation.
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