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Denver

Establishment neighborhood
The Eating Recovery Center
1830 Franklin St.,, Denver, Colorado
This national program offers residential, partial hospitalization, and outpatient level recovery services for adults, adolescents, and children struggling with binge eating, bulimia, anorexia, and other eating and mood disorders. The course of care is tailored to each person's needs and includes an autonomous step-down level to help people transition back into their daily lives after treatment. There are more than ten Eating Recovery Centers throughout the US.
Lynn D. Austin
[email protected]
Lynn Austin does most of her work by phone—but she's one of those people who puts a lot of emotion into her voice (and belly laughs), so a reading with her is more like a casual chat with a friend. She is an evidential medium, and will produce plenty of names and anecdotes, describing what she is seeing all-the-while. She is also known for her work with pets, and is particularly good at addressing the issue of children—whether you have them, want them, or are curious as to know if you will be having more.
Rebecca Rosen
[email protected]
While Rebecca Rosen has been busy writing bestselling books and hosting a TV show, The Last Goodbye, she still sees clients in her Denver office, and sets up readings across the country as well. While you can apply through her site for a one-on-one, she typically does two-hour sessions with groups of eight, where everyone is guaranteed a reading. Interestingly enough (though perhaps not surprisingly), she finds that the groups are drawn together for a reason, where most attendees are going through something similar, whether it's the dissolution of a marriage or the loss of a child. Rebecca's readings are packed with both stunningly accurate and concrete details—names, dates, events—and nuance, as she is masterful at decoding and drawing meaning from signs sent from the other side, including little stories that they might have observed. Her latest book, What the Dead Have Taught Me About Living Well, is packed with useful tools and meditations for opening your intuition and learning how to communicate with loved ones who have passed.
Guard & Grace
1801 California St., Downtown
Named after chef Troy Guard (and his daughter, Grace), this 9,000-square-foot space tucked into the street level of the fifty-six-floor CenturyLink Tower is home to the best steaks in the city. Bright, airy, and sleek, with just enough touches of warmth to keep it from being too corporate, Guard & Grace offers everything we’d want from a modern steakhouse: elevated, fresh seafood (plus a raw bar), amazing charcuterie, perfect martinis, and of course, local grass-fed cuts of beef offered in 4 to 22 oz. portions. There’s no official dress code, but it is definitely dressed-up for Denver.
Il Posto
2601 Larimer St., RiNo
After nine years at its original location in Uptown, Il Posto has recently re-opened in this two-story space, double the size, in the RiNo area. The sculptural light installation, 12-seat bar topped with a slab of Carrara marble, dark wood floors, and impressive views of Downtown are certainly a sleek departure from the old space, but Chef Andrea Frizzi’s Italian menu continues to impress—take, for instance, the beef candle, a bone marrow appetizer that melts into a dip, or more classic Italian standbys like their house-made burrata with huckleberry jam and lavash cracker. The menu may be relatively small, but you can’t go wrong, whether it’s their made-to-order risotto or classic calamari.
To the Wind
3333 E. Colfax Ave., City Park
This bistro on Colfax is super tiny—the 628-square-foot space has only about 20 seats—but it’s worth the (usual) wait. Run by chef Royce Oliveira and his wife and pastry chef Leanne Adamson, the restaurant definitely has a family-run feel; you can expect extra-hospitable service and even a friendly chat with the chefs, if you’re lucky enough to snag a seat at the chef’s counter. The menu is updated daily, depending on available produce and also the popularity of the dishes the night prior—entrées range from buttermilk chicken with creamed quinoa, spinach, and hazelnuts to bison pastrami with gnocchi, cheddar, and sauerkraut. They also have a strong beer selection, with about ten local beers, plus some well-chosen wines and spirits. Note: Despite its size and propensity to fill up quickly, To the Wind doesn’t take reservations, but you can call in advance night-of.
Work & Class
2500 Larimer St., Curtis Park
Work & Class is named to represent its simple ethos, which is their goal to provide a “square meal, stiff drink, and fair price.” And really, that kind of undersells it—the Southern–Latin American menu from chef Dana Rodriguez is full of inventive small plates from bacon-wrapped jalapeños, shrimp and grits, and chickpea croquettes to salads like their “massive attack” (tempura broccoli, asparagus, avocado, spinach, cucumbers, parmesan) to substantial meat and fish offerings like whole fried Idaho trout and cochinita pibil. Designed inside some re-purposed shipping containers, the restaurant is small, always packed, and pretty loud and lively.
Wooden Spoon
2418 W. 32nd Ave., Highlands
Everything in this family-run, neighborhood LoHi café is amazing, from their breakfast pastries (prepared fresh on-site each morning, they typically sell out quickly) to their coffee, to their flour-less apricot oatmeal bars. Their egg sandwich, served on toasted brioche—which you can customize with add-ons like bacon, Swiss, or arugula—gets a special shout-out. The space itself is as charming as you would expect, and the absence of WiFi fosters a community vibe you didn’t realize you were craving.
Goldyn
2040 W. 30th Ave., Highland
Opened in May 2011 and set in the old Olinger mortuary building at the LoHi Marketplace, Goldyn’s OG brick-and-mortar boutique is like a highly fashionable conduit for indie designers more typically found in, say, LA and NYC. But the goods here translate perfectly to the hip LoHi neighborhood and Denver’s generally laid-back vibe; here, you’ll find chic, versatile pieces from designers the likes of Rachel Comey, Lauren Manoogian, Helmut Lang, MM6, and Apiece Apart; boots by Freda Salvador; sunglasses by Illesteva; hats by Janessa Leone; locally made home goods; and handmade beauty products by R.L. Linden & Co.
MAX Clothing Store
264 Detroit St., Cherry Creek
Max Martinez and his eponymous stores (there are also locations in Boulder and Aspen) are really the cream of the Colorado fashion crop. An early buyer of now-household names like Isabel Marant, the boutiques (a partnership between Martinez and owner Scott Seale) always carry a mix of name-brand classics and little-known newcomers. It’s probably the most luxurious of the area’s boutiques, so go for investment pieces like Nili Lotan sweaters, Céline bags, and Pierre Hardy boots. If you can, try to stop in when Max is in the store—in addition to being the warmest host imaginable, he has an amazing eye for pieces that flatter.
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