Travel

Old Toronto

Establishment neighborhood
Dineen Coffee
140 Yonge St., Old Toronto
The Dineen Building is an 1897 Renaissance Revival beauty that now houses the flagship outpost of this popular independent café. Dineen makes a solid matcha latte and macchiato, but really it’s the building itself that’s worth a visit. Double-height ceilings, mosaic-tiled floors, and plenty of natural light and seating means that a quick cortado can turn into a few hours reading and soaking in the warmth next to one of the floor-to-ceiling windows.
Momofuku Toronto
190 University Ave., Old Toronto
David Chang has made quite an entrance in Toronto setting up a three-story Momofuku empire inside the Shangri-La Hotel. Here, his five eateries—the Noodle Bar, Daisho, Shoto, a bar called Nikai, and Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar—each offer a little something different. The structure is super modern in design—it's all glass and wood with no real decorative fuss. No matter where you choose to dine, Chang's signature flavor-packed food coupled with Tosi’s irresistible desserts prevails across all five spots. A quick breakdown: Shoto is a ten-course tasting menu (reservations are essential). Daisho is a described by Chang as Momofuku’s take on a steakhouse, serving lunch and dinner with Asian and international flavors—buttermilk biscuits with garlic butter and chili honey, squash salad with zaatar and labneh, and hoisin duck breast. Nikai specializes in sake and Canadian whiskey, with the added benefit of being able to order Chang's ramen from the Noodle Bar if the mood strikes you.
The Ivy at Verity
111d E. Queen St., Old Toronto
This European-style boutique hotel is smack in the middle of the city, located in what was once an 1850s chocolate factory. Incredibly intimate, the Ivy at Verity has only four unique rooms and is named for its proximity to the Verity—a private, women's-only club. The accommodations are full of personality with vintage-looking wallpaper, soaking tubs, Italian linens, and fresh floral arrangements pulled together by the hotel's own in-house florist. In terms of amenities, you'll find a member's lounge, a restaurant, and a small spa. The Ivy is really more of a romantic inn than a hotel, perfect for those looking for a supremely private stay.
Soho House Toronto
192 W. Adelaide St., Old Toronto
The Toronto outpost of Soho House is in a three-story, 1830s Georgian building—referred to by locals as the Bishop’s Block—and perfectly embodies the intimate, clubby vibe for which the Soho House group is best known. It's conveniently adjacent to the Shangri-La Hotel, and members can use the luxurious pool and gym facilities next door—if they can peel themselves away from the warm familiarity of the clubhouse. The interior is eclectic but sophisticated: The cool-mint drawing room is punctuated with overstuffed sofas, a roaring fireplace, and wood paneling—it's the perfect spot to tuck in for an afternoon.
Shangri-La Toronto
188 University Ave., Old Toronto
Infused with a distinct Eastern aesthetic, the Shangri-La manages to feel personable despite its size. Located in the heart of downtown—just next door to the Toronto outpost of Soho House—you're right in the center of the city's bustle. The accommodations are classically luxurious with huge bathrooms, high thread count sheets, and floor-to-ceiling windows. A real draw is the hotel's Miraj Hammam by Caudalie spa, which fuses traditional hammam-style treatments with Caudalie's signature vinotherapy. A huge benefit of staying at the hotel is its proximity to David Chang's Momofuku empire downstairs. Choose from one of four restaurants, including Chang's signature Noodle Bar, and hit up Milk Bar Bakery for dessert.
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