Travel

British Columbia

Establishment neighborhood
Glory Juice Co.
2186 W. 4th Ave., Kitsilano
Thankfully, you’ll find a few Glory Juice Co. outposts scattered around Vancouver. Their robust, healthy menu of smoothies, juices, bowls, and salads makes eating on-the-go so much easier. The “nutty green” is packed with non-dairy seed milk, cold-pressed juice, nut butter, dates, hemp and spirulina (and is super filling), while their house-made avocado chia flatbread (it’s gluten-free) is topped with pickled onions and a scattering of sprouts for a kick and makes for the perfect breakfast. Glory Juice also offers cleanses on how to make your own healthy concoctions.
Kokomo
611 Gore Ave., Chinatown
Katie Ruddell was in charge of brand strategy and marketing at Lululemon before opening Kokomo in the heart of Chinatown—essentially to cater to her own health food cravings. The vegan fare is gluten-, dairy-, and nut-free, accommodating all dietary restrictions but without compromising on taste. The modern décor creates a pleasant lunch setting, but be sure to come early, as Kokomo fills up fast. Order the Coastal Macro Bowl (the vegan spot’s most popular dish, and for good reason), which includes brown rice, roasted squash, and edamame hummus.
Edgewood Health Network
2121 Boxwood Road, Nanaimo, Ontario
Edgewood Health Network incorporates evidence-based cognitive behavioral and dialectal behavioral therapies into its approach to treat people suffering from eating disorders and addiction. A team of physicians, nutritionists, and psychiatrists works with each person to create an individualized plan that treats the whole self, supplementing a clinical approach with yoga and other mindfulness-based wellness treatments. There are three inpatient campuses—in Toronto, Montreal, and Nanaimo—and various outpatient clinics across Canada.
Clayoquot Wilderness Resort
UNESCO Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve, Tofino
This sustainability-minded, hyper-luxe hotel-slash-campsite nestled into the stunning UNESCO Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve is one of those once-in-a-lifetime experience. The team does everything for you, from picking you upon arrival via a floatplane to catering to every hospitality need when you're staying in your own private–and lavish–safari-style tent. The daily activities are seemingly endless, from hiking to horseback riding to salmon fishing–all of which leave you hungry and even more appreciative of the decadent, local, chef-prepared meals served daily. There's even a spa on location, offering restorative massages and yoga.
The Wickaninnish Inn
Osprey Ln., Tofino
With the rolling waves of the Pacific Ocean out front, a dense rainforest in the back, and jagged cliffs or beaches on either side, family-owned hotel The Wickaninnish Inn is about as close to nature as you can get without pitching a tent among the pine trees. Though overused, in the context of its driftwood-dotted interiors, ample fireplaces (there’s one in every room), and on-site woodcarving shed, “rustic” is by far the best adjective for describing the inn’s warm, welcoming personality. For storm chasers, observation points to take in the drama from a comfortable distance are scattered throughout the property, including the guestrooms, where floor-to-ceiling windows, overstuffed chairs, and binoculars are worked into the minimalist décor for that very purpose. (For those hell-bent on experiencing some weather first hand, each room comes with rain gear and wellies). Best of all, you can get a view from the top before you even step foot on the grounds by hopping on a seaplane over from the mainland.
Vancouver Art Gallery
750 Hornby St., Downtown
Over 11,000 works representing a century of art produced in British Columbia and the Asia-Pacific region—with a heavy focus on the creative contributions of the First Nations—fill the Vancouver Art Gallery. The program schedule keeps it interesting, with exhibits on everything from Scandinavian design to portraiture. A recent favorite is Hyderabadi artist Asim Waqif's "Salvage" show, a visual commentary on the waste generated by the excesses of modern living. Waqif built a completely immersive architectural experience using waste products salvaged from shipyards, landfills, and demolition sites in the city. Guests are encouraged to make their way through the structures and contemplate what we should really determine as waste, and the social responsibility we all share in moving towards sustainability.
The Seawall
Stanley Park, Downtown
The Seawall (mostly contained within Stanley Park) is the world’s longest, uninterrupted waterfront path, hugging the sea for a full 14 miles along Vancouver’s waterfront. You can walk or bike the trail—there’s a pedestrian-specific section of around five miles that takes two to three hours to complete, depending on the person—and take in the driftwood-strewn beaches, views of the city skyline, cedar-covered mountains, and the Lions Gate bridge. A dream for nature-lovers or parents looking to give kiddos a chance to run off some energy.
Stanley Park
Downtown
There’s no denying Vancouverite's passion for the outdoors, every inch of the city is covered in joggers, bikers, or people simply enjoying their surroundings. Stanley Park is the locals' playground, a sprawling green oasis spanning 1,000 acres, and covered in trails, wildlife, landmarks, and a handful of restaurants smack in the middle of the city. Our favorite for a long hike, the Siwash Rock Trail leads to a historic rock—that depicts the legends of the local Siwash people—and is over 32 million-years-old. Other must-sees include the First Nations totem poles at Brockton Point, the Rose Gardens, and the Seawall. For those visiting with kiddos, the miniature train is a perfect family activity that takes you on a winding journey through the breathtaking wilderness of the park.
Museum of Vancouver
1100 Chestnut St., Kitsilano
The founding mission of the Museum of Vancouver has major civic undertones: The facility seeks to encourage inter-community understanding via an incredible archive of photographs that document the century of public activism that has shaped the city’s identity. The permanent collection comprises ethnographic, archaeological, and natural history objects. A real bonus is the kid's program: the museum regularly schedules day trips to archaeological digs, organizes hands-on experiences with ancient artifacts, and hosts scavenger hunts through the galleries for the whole family on weekends.
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