Travel

San Francisco Specialty

Establishment neighborhood
Living Greens (Closed)
1501 Cortland Ave., Bernal Heights
The adorable origin story behind Living Greens follows the relationship between founders Brian and Michelle, who started writing juice recipes together when they were first dating. More than seven years later, their juice cleanses are some of the best in SF. Living Greens has a strong sustainability component to their business, serving all organic produce and working with local farms on top of operating a virtually zero waste kitchen. Plus, every quarter they donate a portion of their profits to a different nonprofit organization. They're three locations strong now, with stores in the Financial District and at 331 Marketplace.
Living Greens
Bush St. & Trinity Plaza, Financial District
The adorable origin story behind Living Greens follows the relationship between founders Brian and Michelle, who started writing juice recipes together when they were first dating. More than seven years later, their juice cleanses are some of the best in SF. Living Greens has a strong sustainability component to their business, serving all organic produce and working with local farms on top of operating a virtually zero waste kitchen. Plus, every quarter they donate a portion of their profits to a different nonprofit organization.
Del Popolo
855 Bush St., Union Square
Before adding a bricks-and-mortar location last year, the guys at Del Popolo were slinging pies out of their now-famous mobile pizzeria. Why famous? Other than the killer Neapolitan-style pizzas, which range from classic Margherita to a honey-spiked potato pie, it’s the ingenious use of a converted shipping container fastened onto a Freightliner truck in place of a standard food truck that got people talking. And lucky for us all, even with the free-standing restaurant (they tacked on some antipasti dishes and a pretty badass wine list to the restaurant menu), they’re still serving pies on the go all over the city out of the mobile pizzeria that started it all.
Blue Bottle Coffee
300 Webster St., Oakland
There are now ten locations strong in the bay area, with cafés in the Ferry Building, Hayes Valley, Heath Ceramics, Market Square, Mint Plaza, and on Sansome. There are two locations in Oakland, on Broadway and Webster St. Perhaps the most groundbreaking of their brews is the chicory-spiked New Orleans cold brew, which comes in a handy single-serving carton. They also make a pretty great granola in-house while the SFMOMA rooftop location is home to Chef Caitlin Freeman’s modern art desserts. Think: a loaf cake made to look like a Mondrian painting and cookies inspired by Richard Serra’s sculptures.
Blue Bottle Coffee
4270 Broadway, Oakland
There are now ten locations strong in the bay area, with cafés in the Ferry Building, Hayes Valley, Heath Ceramics, Market Square, Mint Plaza, and on Sansome. There are two locations in Oakland, on Broadway and Webster St. Perhaps the most groundbreaking of their brews is the chicory-spiked New Orleans cold brew, which comes in a handy single-serving carton. They also make a pretty great granola in-house while the SFMOMA rooftop location is home to Chef Caitlin Freeman’s modern art desserts. Think: a loaf cake made to look like a Mondrian painting and cookies inspired by Richard Serra’s sculptures.
Blue Bottle Coffee
115 Sansome St., Financial District
There are now ten locations strong in the bay area, with cafés in the Ferry Building, Hayes Valley, Heath Ceramics, Market Square, Mint Plaza, and on Sansome. There are two locations in Oakland, on Broadway and Webster St. Perhaps the most groundbreaking of their brews is the chicory-spiked New Orleans cold brew, which comes in a handy single-serving carton. They also make a pretty great granola in-house while the SFMOMA rooftop location is home to Chef Caitlin Freeman’s modern art desserts. Think: a loaf cake made to look like a Mondrian painting and cookies inspired by Richard Serra’s sculptures.
Blue Bottle Coffee
1355 Market St., SoMa
There are now ten locations strong in the bay area, with cafés in the Ferry Building, Hayes Valley, Heath Ceramics, Market Square, Mint Plaza, and on Sansome. There are two locations in Oakland, on Broadway and Webster St. Perhaps the most groundbreaking of their brews is the chicory-spiked New Orleans cold brew, which comes in a handy single-serving carton. They also make a pretty great granola in-house while the SFMOMA rooftop location is home to Chef Caitlin Freeman’s modern art desserts. Think: a loaf cake made to look like a Mondrian painting and cookies inspired by Richard Serra’s sculptures.
The Golden West
8 Trinity Pl., Financial District
The Golden West is tucked into a small alley in the Financial District, and its takeout-only counter is marked with a neon “Au” sign. The menu is limited to a few items, and while everything from the salads to the daily specials is excellent, they’re really famous for the pork rib sandwich—a messy, sauce-y pile of stewed short ribs topped with caramelized onions and served on a freshly baked roll. If you must be health-conscious, the spicy chicken salad is also great. Photo: Alex Roberts.
Lucca Delicatessen
2120 Chestnut St., Marina
Lucca deli has been a family operation since 1929—brother-and-sister pair Paul and Linda Bosco are actually the grandchildren of the original owner. Accordingly, the place has all the trappings of an amazing Italian deli: salami hanging from the ceiling, cheese wheels aging behind the counter, shelves packed with canned and jarred goods, and fresh tortellini and ravioli, which is still made by hand. The Italian sandwiches are a worthy lunch indulgence, with crusty rolls (delivered fresh daily), provolone, fresh-sliced meats, and their secret ingredient, a roasted red pepper spread.
Eatsa
121 Spear St., Financial District
The concept of Eatsa is to provide the convenience and speed of fast food with the nutrition of the slow food movement, and their high-tech presentation is so San Francisco. The speed comes from their specially designed ordering system—you’ll order and pay either on your phone ahead of time or on an iPad in store. When you arrive (or in a few minutes if you order on-site) your food is ready to take away with you, in a human-free cubby with your name on it. They achieve this efficiency in the kitchen by offering a few easy-to-build quinoa bowls that you can customize to suit your tastes. The Mediterranean salad is great for the carb-conscious, as is the “no worry curry.” With each bowl ringing in at less than $7, they're expanding quickly: there's already a second location on California Street.
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