Travel

Los Angeles Shops

Establishment neighborhood
HATCH
240 26th St., Brentwood
Every pregnancy is unique, but every pregnant person has had one shared experience: The moment you realize you can no longer get away with wearing your regular jeans. (Skirts, jumpsuits, and dresses are next.) HATCH in Brentwood is the next natural stop for many of the local women we know. The airy, achingly pretty store is lined with racks of easy, floaty dresses, some of the best bump-friendly denim, and everything else in between—all of which is cut to accommodate a woman’s body both during and long after pregnancy. In other words, these are things you won’t want to get rid of as soon as the aforementioned jeans start to fit again. And like the Manhattan store, there’s also a cravings bar with pickles, ice cream, and more. Cliché? Maybe. But we’ve yet to meet a mama-to-be who’d turn down a good dill.
Platform
8850 Washington Blvd., Culver City
With the long-awaited completion of the Expo Line, a train that connects Culver City to both Downtown and Santa Monica, the area is in the midst of a period of immense growth. Platform, an indoor/outdoor space devoted to shopping and eating, is right next to the train stop. But calling it a straight-up mall feels off. In place of the usual shop suspects, there’s a Monocle pop-up, a Janessa Leone boutique, a Tenoverten nail salon, and the only Westside outpost of Poketo. And while you won’t see a food court, what you will find are a dozen or so restaurants—both casual (Loqui tacos, Van Leeuwen ice cream, Boba Guys) and not (Margot). The pièce de résistance is Roberta’s, Brooklyn’s finest, where they know how to sling a pizza.
Erica Tanov
1318 E 7th St., Downtown
We've admired designer Erica Tanov's bohemian printed separates and eclectic selection of fashion and homewares since we discovered her namesake Berkeley boutique nearly ten years ago. Tanov has that cool-girl knack for finding unexpected items—say, a linen blouse made in India, a pair of edgy Officine Creative black boots, or a set of vintage jewel-colored cocktail glasses. Her bohemian inventory is right at home in its latest location, downtown's vibrant and artsy Row.
Palisades Village
15225 Palisades Village Ln., Pacific Palisades
Rick Caruso, the real estate mogul behind the Grove and the Americana, has built, in his signature classic California style, 2019’s answer to the mini mall. It’s contemporary, mostly outdoors (this is LA, after all), and frankly, too beautiful to be called a mall at all. Veronica Beard, Jennifer Meyer Jewelry, and Vince are just a sampling of the thirty-three stores on the property that manages to feel more like a quaint little village than a retail experience. The restaurants deliver, with Edoardo Baldi’s (of famous Beverly Hills E. Baldi Ristorante), Sweet Laurel Bakery, and the more casual Edo Little Bites leading the charge.
Kinto
767 S Alameda St., Downtown
New to DTLA, Kinto focus on striking a balance between beauty and functionality when it comes to building out the ultimate home cook’s kitchen. In other words, not only will the delicate Japanese pottery and double-wall champagne glasses on offer add pizzazz to your counters but, thanks to Kinto’s obsession with quality, they’ll stand the test of time, too. With the coffeeware collection of carafe sets and porcelain brewers, you’ll navigate your kitchen with the dexterity of an artisanal coffee-shop barista.
Now Serving
727 N. Broadway, Unit 133., Downtown
This quaint bookshop, nestled in the heart of Chinatown, is made for those rare, rainy afternoons in Los Angeles. (Though we’ve been known to use the stacks as a hiding place from the sun, too.) You could spend hours getting lost among the hundreds of curated cookbooks and knickknacks ranging from salt cellars to vintage bandannas all tucked away on the corner of North Hill Street. Not only does it offer an extensive range of unique reads, such as the Portuguese tea magazine Eighty Degrees, but Now Serving regularly hosts book signings and guest speakers with many of the authors whose work lines the shelves. Follow them on Instagram (@nowservingLA) to stay up to date on upcoming events.
ROW DTLA
777 Alameda St., Downtown
There’s no way to grasp the size and scope of ROW DTLA without seeing it in person, so we won’t attempt to describe this massive conglomerate of industrial structures as anything but WOW. What we can put into words is the impressive the curation of places to eat, shop, work, and just chill. A sampling of restaurants includes San Francisco’s Tartine Manufactory, Japanese food at Hayato (order a bento box), and the flakiest, crunchiest Japanese fried chicken we’ve ever had at chef Kuniko Yagi’s Pikunico. Stores are focused on locally owned businesses, like Erica Tanov, Kinto, Ahlem, and Bodega—arguably the most well-stocked sneaker store in the city. On weekends, the streets are closed off to cars, leaving ample space for kids to shake the willies out. On Sundays, Smorgasburg LA takes over ROW DTLA’a neighbor, the Alameda Produce Market.
The GREAT
8575 Melrose Ave., West Hollywood
Designers Emily Current and Merritt Elliott are known for their denim line Current/Elliott. In 2015, they launched the GREAT., a vintage-inspired line of denim, embroidered sweatshirts, and super soft tees. The 1,800-square-foot space sits on a well-trafficked stretch of Melrose Avenue, and features plenty of thoughtful details: Fixtures are inspired by antique brass buttons and rivets on denim, Venetian Murano glass chandeliers hang overhead, and there’s a wall lined with hand-painted green Moroccan tile—a nod to the brand’s signature army jackets. Another visual coup is the wallcovering, done in collaboration with Portola paint, and meant to resemble timeworn denim. There’s the core line, for which they’re best known, but there are also lots of one-offs: a hand-selected assortment of vintage clothes and jewelry, plus little things that make great gifts, like perfume from Coqui Coqui, embroidered bandanas, and beautifully wrapped sage bundles.
Aldea Home & Baby
3825 Main St., Culver City
It’s perfectly logical that after nurturing a thriving community of parents and kids in San Francisco’s Mission District, kid’s store Aldea founder Johanna Bialkin would set her sights on an equally family-oriented LA neighborhood: Culver City. That’s because community is just as big a part of the Aldea ethos as sustainability (most toys, clothes, and furniture reside on the eco-friendly spectrum), creativity (there are things here we’ve never seen anywhere else), and aesthetics (Oeuf, Monte, and Aelfie are just a few of the design-y brands on offer). There are weekly wine nights (for parents), story time (for kids), mommy-and-me yoga classes, live music, and more (for parents and kids). Walk through shelves upon shelves of giftables and Iittle nooks you’ll want to lift directly from the store and plop in your home as is—and the good news is that you totally can, by setting up an Aldea registry.
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