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Travel

The Tokyo Guide

The Tokyo Guide

Like any world-class international epicenter of culture, urbanity, and modernity, you can never complete Tokyo. It’s too much—38 million people swarming in and out of a city that lives both in the past and the future at the same time is no place for limits. If there’s one thing you can be sure of, however, it’s that everything you do and see in Tokyo will be extremely Tokyo—a set of experiences distinct from almost any other place in the world. So relax a bit; take off on a walk without really knowing where you’re going. If you follow the suggestions mentioned below—including and especially stopping by the just-opened goop TOKYO pop—you can’t go wrong. And if you get lost, well, lucky you.

PSA: Tokyo’s public transport is incredible, but for those on foot, it’s worth noting many of the streets don’t have names. To navigate the city, a map (rest assured, Japanese maps are extremely detailed) or making sure your phone is hooked up with Wi-Fi is essential.

goop TOKYO

goop TOKYO

9-7-3 Akasaka, Minato-ku

We’ve been under Tokyo’s spell for quite some time, and we couldn’t be more excited to say these five words: We just opened goop TOKYO. In the buzzing Roppongi area, goop has taken a 2,000-square-foot space and turned it into a wellness universe, amply stocked with our organic, nontoxic skin care (if we may, the Exfoliating Instant Facial will make your skin glow like nobody’s business) and bath soaks, plus the best edit of G. Sport and G. Label. In a completely new move, this is also the site of the first-ever goop café. goop Kitchen serves up the same nourishing, California-style, clean food you’ll find in all four of GP’s cookbooks and across the site. They say you should never shop while hungry, so tuck into the heavenly vegan miso kale salad and the sweet but healthy avocado chocolate mousse before losing track of time in the store. We’re open through May 26, so by all means, please come and say konnichiwa.

1LDK

1LDK

153-0051 Tokyo, Meguro | +81.3.5728.7140

The store’s name comes from a Japanese real estate term: 1LDK means a one-bedroom apartment with a common living/dining/kitchen area. 1LDK’s store is decidedly larger—it’s spread out over two buildings that are across the street from each other. One building houses the menswear collection, while the other contains the women’s line, housewares, and the café. Look for clothing and other items in muted hues of beige and grey, and enjoy a coffee or beer at the café for a quick break. When you’re done, stroll around the nearby canals of the always-hip Nakameguro neighborhood.

45 RPM

45 RPM

7-7-21, Minami-Aoyama | +81.03.5778.0045

Sure, you can go to 45rpm’s shops in New York or San Francisco, but you can also go to a day spa in a strip mall—it’s not the same thing. Pay a visit to this legendary label for its simple, beautifully constructed men’s and women’s clothes that mix elements of the Japanese countryside with European silhouettes. The shop is worth visiting on its own: a simulacrum of a Japanese residence, with floors rinsed as per Shinto tradition, and series of quiet rooms to display the label’s brilliance with cotton, denim, and indigo.

Akomeya

Akomeya

2-6, Chuo | +81.03.6758.0270

Akomeya, by rice retailer Sazaby League, is like a Japanese Dean & DeLuca on steroids, in the best possible way. With thousands of rice-related products, including wooden boxes used for measuring rice and sake, rice pots, beautiful utensils, food products such as crackers, and much more, the shop celebrates the elegant simplicity of the food that is so characteristic of Japan. The rice bar in front of the store allows you to choose the grade of brown rice you want before choosing how much you’d like it polished, which they do on the spot—the highest level removes the entire hull, leaving you with white rice (which most Japanese customers prefer), while a lighter polish will leave a bit more fiber. This shop is a must for the food lover while in Tokyo.

Beams

Beams

3-25-15 Jingumae, Harajuku | 81.3.3470.8601

Started more than forty years ago in Harajuku, Beams has gone from being another clothing store in Tokyo to a trailblazer in Japanese fashion. In a recent survey, Japanese women were asked where they’d want their boyfriend to shop, and Beams was the top choice. The store caters to both men and women, specializing in domestic designers, and also has housewares and accessories. The house-brand staples are of amazingly high quality (T-shirts and underwear), so be sure to pick up some to take back home.

Comme des Garçons

Comme des Garçons

5 Chome-2-1 Minamiaoyama, Minato City | +81.334.063.951

Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo has always done things in her own, inimitable way. She favors black, doesn’t believe in mixing two seasons on the shop floor, and limits the availability of her clothing online, believing that the value of trying on a piece and feeling the weight and texture of the fabric far outweighs that of click-and-collect. And the Comme des Garçons flagship in the upmarket Aoyama district defies expectation. Designed by Future Systems under Kawakubo’s direction, the space looks more like an undulating glass display case than a store. Diligent shoppers make the pilgrimage here not only to gawk at the sculptural beauty but to nab those impossible-to-find runway looks.

Isetan

Isetan

160-0022 Tokyo | 81.3.3352.1111

What started as a kimono shop in 1866 has become one of the most influential department stores in the world. The store is spread over two buildings, with a men’s wing larger than most entire department stories. Small designers and bigger labels happily coexist throughout, as does a formal kimono section on the seventh floor that should not be missed. The service is said to be the best in Tokyo (which is saying something). Also, don’t miss: Below the food hall, on the lower level, is a natural-beauty and health food section that is the envy of the world.

J’antiques

J’antiques

2 Chome-25-13, Meguro

Regularly cited as one of the best vintage shops in the world, J’Antiques is like Ralph Lauren on Adderall: a furiously focused and dazzling array of vintage clothing and accessories. Both men and women will have plenty to sort through here, from cotton dresses to varsity jackets. Old signs, buttons, safety pins, and household linens are mixed in with the apparel. As expected, prices here are not cheap, but the inventory is unlike what you’ll find anywhere else, and just walking around the store for inspirational purposes (as many designers have been known to do, in fact) is reason enough to pay a visit. Image courtesy of acontinuouslean.com.

La Kagu

La Kagu

67 Yaraicho, Kagurazaka | +81.3.5227.6977

In four short years, La Kagu has become a hive of activity in picturesque Kagurazaka. The converted library is one part boutique, one part café, and one part bookstore. In addition to that, look for furniture, reading events, farmers’ markets, and other gatherings. For the simple act of shopping, visitors will find items from Blamink, Maison Margiela, Ebure, and others. If nothing else, browse around and grab a small bite from the café—La Kagu is worth seeing just to reconfigure your idea of what a store can really be.

Prada

Prada

5-2-6, Minami-Aoyama | 81.3.6418.0400

You can buy Prada in lots of places. You still have to come to this store. The six-story structure by Herzog & de Meuron was an instant sensation when it opened in 2003, and it remains a singular architectural achievement. Nestled in the dense Aoyama district, the store immediately surprises with its generous open space around the structure. But it’s the now-famous diamond-shaped glazing, moving from flat to convex across the skin of the building, that immediately catches the eye. Inside, floors and structural forms blend from one into the other and back again. It’s a tour de force, worth a visit even if you leave empty-handed (though with every Prada line on display here, that may be difficult).

Sacai

Sacai

2F Minami-Aoyama City House, 5-4-44, Minami-Aoyama, | +81.3.6418.5977

Socrates taught Plato; Plato taught Aristotle. Rei Kawakubo mentored Junya Watanabe, and both mentored Chitose Abe. In 1999, she started her own label, Sacai (a derivation of her maiden name, Sakai). You’d think a store would be quick to follow, but Abe doesn’t follow the same old playbook. She waited twelve years before opening her flagship in Tokyo’s Aoyama neighborhood. The store was a collaboration with rising starchitecht Sosuke Fujimoto, and the results are a perfect complement to Abe’s designs: a space that embraces the contemporary and the classic, bringing both together to create something truly new.

Tokyu Hands

Tokyu Hands

12-18, Ikebukoro | +81.3.5489.5111

Okay, so how to describe Tokyu Hands? Take a Walmart, add a Michael’s craft store, mix in some Ikea, a dash of your local hardware store and…that still doesn’t really describe this unique Japanese institution. Tokyu Hands describes itself as a “hint store,” giving you all the tools and materials you need to build a better life. Would like you choose between hundreds of different toothbrushes? How about a room of wooden blocks? More stationery than you know what to do with? Maybe you’d like to spend some time in a cat café (Ikebukoro location only)? If you can imagine it (and, more importantly, if you can’t), it’s at Tokyu Hands.

Tsutaya Books

Tsutaya Books

17-5 Sarugakucho, Daikanyama | 81.3.3770.2525

This is not the first article to call Tsutaya “the greatest bookstore in the world,” and it’s not likely to be the last. And that’s because it’s the truth. This three-building complex is a world unto itself. Tsutaya includes an unparalleled collection of books and periodicals from Japan and around the world; a video department that has just about every movie ever made (and if it doesn’t the store can download it and burn it to a DVD on the spot); a 120,000-album music department, replete with listening stations to hear any track and concierges to guide you to the right choice in a given genre; a rare-book-and-magazine lounge with a dining menu and full bar; a camera shop; a travel office; a pet-goods store; three cafés; one of the best stationery stores in Japan; and a full-service restaurant with an outdoor deck. Trust us: Just go.

Takashimaya

Takashimaya

151-8580, Shinjuku | 81.3.5361.1111

This is a fantastic department store (check out the Hall of Roses on the fourth floor for a dazzling floral display), but the main attraction is down in the basement, in what’s called the depachika, the food courts for which many Tokyo department stores are famous. Takashimaya’s Shinjuku store has one of the larger food courts in Tokyo, and is replete with both Japanese and Western delicacies, including a Kit Kat store that’ll amaze. As part of a larger Shinjuku development, the store is also adjacent to a Tokyu Hands, and includes a Kinokuniya book shop.

WEGO

WEGO

6-5-3, Harajuku | +81.03.3400.7625

Obviously, you have to go to Harajuku. Tokyo’s epicenter of street style sets trends all around the globe, and one of the key stores that helps propel those trends is Tokyo institution WEGO. While it may look at first like a vintage store, everything at WEGO is new—and relatively inexpensive. The store is a riot of Japanese and American pop culture (are those the California Raisins over there? Yep). If you need any guidance on what to buy, just look around you—the store’s staff is a walking look book for the latest and greatest styles in stock.

Mine Denim

Mine Denim

2-5-8 Iwai Buildong Jingumae, Shibuya | +81.03.6721.0757

Tokyo has a lot of denim. Some of it’s great. Much of it is caught up in an orthodoxy that is stifling, however. Mine Denim, the brainchild of noted Tokyo stylist Tsuyoshi Noguchi (whose work has appeared in Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Elle, among other places), is a departure from that tyranny. The store, located in Shibuya, juxtaposes intricately inlaid wood floors with crisp white walls and a stark, black staircase. His men’s and women’s collections use the Japan’s beloved denim, but in new and creative ways (his collection of dramatic, flowing skirts will take your breath away).