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The Paris Foodie Guide

The Paris Foodie Guide

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Oh the many culinary delights of Paris, from goose fat fried potatoes to sole meuniere to the simple pleasures of an almond croissant. It seems like there’s a Michelin starred joint on every corner, and an equally wonderful cheese shop or bakery to back it up. Here, our favorites of Paris’ gastro treasures. Image courtesy of @parisinfourmonths

Jugetsudo by Maruyama

Jugetsudo by Maruyama

95 Rue de Seine, 6th | +33.1.46.33.94.90

Stalks of bamboo dangle from the ceiling like hundreds of wind-chimes at this Saint-Germain-des-Prés spot, which is the first outpost outside of Japan for the historic, 19th-century teahouse, Jugetsedo. Upstairs, you can sample any number of green tees, from earthy Sencha, to nutty Genmaicha, to creamy Macha. In the cellar-like basement, you can participate in a full, uber-traditional tea service.

Breizh Café

Breizh Café

109 Rue Vieille du Temple, 3rd | +33.1.42.72.13.77

We like to take a detour here while shopping on rue Vieille du Temple. Though the buckwheat crepes are the main draw, there’s a small shop attached to the café that sells jams, ciders, and delicious cheeses.

Bellota Bellota

Bellota Bellota

18 Rue Jean Nicot, 7th | +33.1.53.59.96.96

This cozy little Spanish shop and restaurant serves up great tapas and solid selection of Spanish wine, but their real specialty is the store’s namesake charcuterie. Jamón Ibérico de Bellota, which comes from acorn-finished hogs, is the crème de la crème of cured meats. Their gift baskets, with include a few different varieties, make great gifts for fellow foodies.

Marché Avenue du Président Wilson

Marché Avenue du Président Wilson

Avenue du Président Wilson, 16th

Located between the 16th and 7th arrondisements, the quiet, well-mannered vibe of this market is well suited to its upscale clientele. (It’s a great option if you’re the kind of shopper who is easily overwhelmed by shouting vendors and pushy customers.) As for the wares, expect fresh bread, flowers, seafood, olives, spices, vegetables, cheese, fruit, and even prepared foods. Friends tell us that farmer Joël Thiébault (who owns a family-run vegetable operation just outside the city) is a standout for his unique, visually stunning heirlooms.

Le Moulin de la Vierge

Le Moulin de la Vierge

152 Rue Montmartre, 2nd | +33.1.40.52.55.55

With a façade lettered in gold paint, vintage mirrors paneling the walls, and an original hand-painted frescoe on the ceiling, Le Moulin de la Vierge is the French bakery dreams are made of. Owner Basile Kamir found the space in the 1970s (he was a music journalist at the time), and was using it to house his record collection when he found out the building was slated for demolition. In an unlikely career change, he started the bakery to restore the space’s original purpose and save it from being destroyed. After 40 years, he’s still churning out French bread worthy of the stunning space he’s housed in.

Marché Barbès

Marché Barbès

Boulevard de la Chapelle, 18th | +33.45.11.71.11

Marché Barbès is underneath a train trestle at the Barbès Metro station, and the rumble of the trains above only adds to the boisterous atmosphere of the place, which is always packed to the brim with shoppers rushing around and haggling with vendors. The goods here can be much less expensive than those in other markets around town, and while you probably won’t find a rare artisanal cheese, you can stock up on necessities for the week without breaking the bank. This neighborhood is also home to a lot of Paris’s immigrants, which means a much more diverse crowd and the added benefit of North and West African spices and peppers for sale. Photo credit: Eric Parker

Frenchie To Go

Frenchie To Go

9 Rue du Nil, 2nd | +33.1.40.39.96.19

Inspired by American delis and cafés, the emphasis (as its name would suggest) is on take-out—though you can just as easily eat the fish 'n chips, lobster rolls, and marbled pastrami reubens at one of the spot’s high top tables. Like the rest of the Frenchie family, the food is sublimely good: We’re particularly partial to the breakfast.

Du Pain et Des Idées

Du Pain et Des Idées

34 Rue Yves Toudic, 10th | +33.1.42.40.44.52

Baker Christophe Vasseur has won innumerable awards for the pastries at his tiny corner boulangerie in the 10th, which makes perfect sense. Don’t be put off by the lines—which extend around the block—since the effort justifies the wait. Do as the locals do and come here to stock up on daily bread, along with pain aux raisin, and the chausson à la pomme fraîche (puff pastry stuffed with half of a baked apple). Basically, you can’t go wrong.

G. Detou

G. Detou

58 Rue Tiquetonne, 2nd | +33.1.42.36.54.67

Whether you’re a baker or not, G. Detou is worth a visit. The walls are stacked (literally) from floor to ceiling with specialty baking ingredients for even the most ambitious baking project: artisian flower, specialty oils, metallic cake decorations, and even edible flowers. Their selection of dark chocolate is one of the best in the city.

La Cuisine Paris

La Cuisine Paris

80 Quai de l'Hôtel de Ville, 4th | +33.1.40.51.78.18

Offering bilingual cooking classes, La Cuisine Paris teaches the basics of French cooking along with master classes in everything from macarons to poultry. If you're booking in August, make sure to ask whether they are taking Mondays off.

Poilâne

Poilâne

8 Rue du Cherche-Midi, 6th | +33.1.45.48.42.59

This mini-chainlet is now three Paris locations strong (with two outposts in London), which makes a lot of sense: The bread really is distinguishably excellent, which in a place like Paris, says a lot. Though the sourdough loaves fly off the shelves, we love their nut breads—along with the fact that you can purchase by the half or quarter loaf if you can't take down the entire thing. There's usually a line, and while there's nothing to be done about that, you can always duck into La Cuisine de Bar instead. It's a sandwich shop next to the location in the 6th, where they make sandwiches from Poilâne bread. Other locations: Eiffel Tower district and the Marais.

Mariage Frères

Mariage Frères

30 Rue du Bourg Tibourg, 4th | +33.1.42.72.28.11

Enlisted by Louis XIV's court to explore the tea trade in the 1600s, Nicolas and Pierre Mariage sailed the globe in search of exotic offerings, passing the mantle down from generation to generation. In 1854, Henri and Edouard Mariage settled on land and launched a tea wholesale business in Paris, catering to the city's finest hotels and restaurants. They didn't open their doors to the public until the 1980s—and business has been brisk, to say the least, ever since. Outfitted with colonial furnishings from the original Mariage Frères office (oversize tea canisters, heavy cabinetry, wicker furniture, potted palms), the Marais outpost offers a literal world of teas—along with small eats and a smattering of home goods, like teapots and gorgeously scented candles (Darjeeling is our favorite). There are outposts all over the city.

Angelina

Angelina

226 Rue de Rivoli, 1st Arrondissement | +33.142.608.200

Paris is one of those special cities that enthusiastically clings on to the more traditional, elegant remnants of the past—Angelina is an embodiment of this (delightful) policy. A classic tearoom that first opened in 1903, the over-the-top Belle Epoque interiors create the ambiance for a truly decadent hour (or two) of sweet indulgence. The sculptural cakes and classic patisserie that line the glass cases are the perfect accompaniment to the main event: Angelina's world-renowned hot chocolate. Choosing from the extensive chocolat chaud menu is no easy feat—we recommend the African hot chocolate, made from a blend of cocoa from Niger, Ghana, and the Ivory Coast whipped into hot milk and cream for the smoothest, slightly sweet, slightly bitter cup. Aside from sweet treats, Angelina serves up well-executed classic French dishes like croque-madame and quiche Lorraine but really it's the chocolate—and the people-watching—that makes this Paris institution a favorite with locals and tourists alike.

Pierre Hermé

Pierre Hermé

86 Champs-Elysées, 8th Arrondissement | +33.1.44.43.79.54

A good part of the local population is of the opinion that Pierre Hermé makes the best macarons in the city. As for the éclairs, croissants, and cakes? You'll just have to do the taste-testing for yourself. This particular outpost is massive, with a sumptuous Art Deco interior to match the contents of the pastry cases. A pretty box of Hermé’s delicately-flavored macarons veloutés (essentially meringue-like macaroons stuffed with a creamy filling) never fails to impress and makes for the perfect, easily-packed gift to bring back home.