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The Lower Manhattan Guide

The Lower Manhattan Guide

While Lower Manhattan used to be somewhat of a ghost town on the weekends—and a sea of bankers during the week—a lot of businesses have been moving south, and with them, a slew of new shops and restaurants. And while the Financial District is still pretty quiet on the weekends, you can count on Tribeca (which is home base for a lot of families) to be full of activity Saturdays and Sundays. Meanwhile, Chinatown, with its close proximity to the Lower East Side, is playing host to a new generation of hipster coffee shops and restaurants. Below, our favorite spots below Canal Street.

Edon Manor

Edon Manor

391 Greenwich St., Tribeca | 212.431.3890

Every season, Edon Manor picks the most desirable shapes from some of the strongest accessory brands: Givenchy, Alaïa, Isabel Marant, and more. It’s almost hard to focus on the shoes, though, since the store—inspired by an English library—is stunning on its own.

La Garconne

La Garconne

465 Greenwich St., Tribeca | 646.553.3303

Slick and all-white, the loft-y space is dotted with wooden racks, filled with all the greatest hits from the popular website, including cutting-edge tailoring from Yohji Yamamoto, Grecian dresses from Zero + Maria Cornejo, and feminine skirts and dresses from Simone Rocha.

Shinola

Shinola

177 Franklin St., Tribeca | 917.728.3000

Based in Detroit, Shinola produces watches (the owners also founded Fossil), bicycles, leather goods, stationery—all boasting American craftmanship and manufacturing. We love the story and the beautifully simple, functional, and heritage-inspired designs.

Steven Alan Annex

Steven Alan Annex

103 Franklin St., Tribeca | 212.343.0692

We head to Steven Alan for the perfectly tailored yet lived-in men's and women's shirting that comes in an endless variety of plaids and stripes. Beyond that, it's the relaxed mix of pieces from designers like A.P.C, Isabel Marant, Rachel Comey, that keeps us coming back. The outpost in Tribeca is the flagship and the original, though there are now locations scattered around the city.

Baxter & Liebchen

Baxter & Liebchen

50 Laight St., Tribeca | 212.431.5050

You will definitely find some budget-busting pieces here that are aggressively pedigreed, but Baxter & Liebchen does a great job of sourcing beautiful anonymous pieces that are a bit more affordable, too. They're also conscious of the fact that they're in New York, meaning you'll find plenty that works well in small spaces—and a lot of storage pieces, like bookshelves and credenzas. They deliver, too.

Korin

Korin

57 Warren St., Financial District | 800.626.2172

This Japanese shop equips restaurants like Nobu and Per Se, meaning it's where pro-chefs go to buy their knives. They're artfully displayed on the wall and in cases throughout the space according to brand and style (they carry traditional Japanese as well as Westernized brands). In addition, we like to shop their selection of lacquered bento boxes and traditional serveware.

Schoolhouse Electric

Schoolhouse Electric

27 Vestry St., Tribeca | 212.226.6113

When Schoolhouse Electric first launched, it focused solely on reproductions of industrial and, well, school-house lighting fixtures. These days, they're a great resource for all sorts of subtly old-timey home goods, whether it's plaid throw blankets, notebooks from Japan, or drawer and cabinet pulls.

Emily Thompson Flowers

Emily Thompson Flowers

142 Beekman St., South Street Seaport | 212.882.1384

Vermont native Emily Thompson earned an MFA in sculpture from UCLA, a fact that’s evident in all of her floral centerpieces—yes, she uses flowers (which tend to be as wild and fecund as possible), but she builds them into boutiques that look like they might have sprung from a Renaissance painting. There are brambles, and sticks, and over-ripe pieces of fruit, all done up to pretty stunning effect.

Seaport Studios

Seaport Studios

19 Fulton St., South Street Seaport | 646.762.4716

This airy, loft-like shop is actually a year-long pop-up, luring a rotating cast of designers like Timo Weiland and Solid & Striped to the Seaport (and the fans that support them). It’s a gorgeous space and in close proximity to some of the area’s best spots for a quick bite, too.

Bowne & Co Stationers

Bowne & Co Stationers

211 Water St., Financial District | 646.315.4478

Officially part of the South Street Seaport Museum, this wonderful, old-world print shop, which actually holds the title of being New York City’s oldest operating business under the same name (Robert Bowne started it in 1775). The 19th-century letter presses are still on-site, and you can buy cards that are still made in the shop today, by master printer Robert Warner. Photo: Tyler Orehek Photography

Whisper Editions

Whisper Editions

8 Fulton St., South Street Seaport

Launched by T Magazine photo director Judith Puckett-Rinella, Whisper Editions is an e-commerce site that sells limited edition collaborations from artists and designers. Case in point: You’ll currently find grey woven totes from Cecilia Pirani, ceramic birdhouses from Michele Quan, and Brown Cannon III surfboards. She’s currently running a year-long pop-up down in the Seaport where you can shop the editions in person.

Hermès Parfumerie

Hermès Parfumerie

Brookfield Place, 225 Liberty St., Financial District

Being one of those brands that never executes anything unless it's perfect and luxurious and gorgeous, it's not surprising that Hermès' brand-new perfume-only boutique is stunning. Crafted from concrete, wood, and metal, and designed in collaboration with RDAI and RF studio architects, the space is set up like a house, complete with a grand library and an entryway that's styled like a garden. Speaking of gardens: Jean Claude Elena, the masterful house perfumer responsible for most of their fragrances, including the Jardins series, tapped his daughter, Celine, to create an exclusive scent for the shop. Called The Shop Around the Corner, it evokes the signature scent of NYC: Deli flowers. Done in a fully Hermès way.

Matt Bernson

Matt Bernson

20 Harrison St., Tribeca | 212.941.7634

You can't really go wrong when you turn out well-designed, well-made, and well-priced shoes, as evidenced by Matt Bernson's booming downtown NYC business. We're big fans here at goop—both of the subtly forward-but-still-classic shapes and the really friendly price tags (they ring in at under $250). It doesn't hurt that Matt himself is a Tribeca dad, and a really nice guy who can often be found at his warm and welcoming flagship boutique.

Cos Bar

Cos Bar

250 Vesey St., Ste. 206 | 212.233.6249

The only thing better than Cos Bar's famously vast offering of makeup, fragrance, bath, and beauty products (including the newly-launched goop organic skincare line) is the exceptional customer service provided by the knowledgeable, genuinely nice beauty consultants, which is exactly how founder Lily Garfield envisioned it back in 1976 when she opened the original Aspen outpost. There are Cos Bars all over the country, including Montecito, La Jolla, and Scottsdale.

Colony

Colony

324 Canal St., Tribeca | 212.334.3808

At this design co-operative, designers like Flat Vernacular, Fort Standard, and Meg Callahan co-exist in beautiful vignettes scattered throughout the space. It’s founder Jean Lin who has a special knack for the whole mix, giving high-design furniture, textiles, and accessories a home-like context.

Jenni Kayne

Jenni Kayne

20 Harrison St., Tribeca | 646.968.9995

Designer Jenni Kayne has finally made things permanent in Manhattan, bringing her sunny Southern California optimism along with her for the brand's first New York City boutique. Much of Kayne's collection—luxe cashmere, textured mules and d'orsay flats, oversized throws, and wear-with-everything ankle boots look right at home in the store's light filled space (complete with bleached floors and white brick walls) in Tribeca. The store will function slightly differently than Kayne's other retail outposts: Instead of a standard brick-and-mortar, it will act more as a showroom for customers to get acquainted with the brand and try things on. So while the store will keep limited stock on hand, many styles and sizes will be available to test-drive and customers can place an online order with expedited shipping. Good news: Fans of JK will be happy to know they're looking to bring their women's speaker series and DIY workshops to the space, too.

Konekt

Konekt

41 Elizabeth St. #302, Chinatown | 610.322.0660

Blurring the line between a modern aesthetic and ages-old craftsmanship, this mother-daughter furniture design studio produces unique, made-to-order sculptural pieces. The background is compelling: Helena Sultan, a former photographer and documentary film maker, founded the collection in 2015, extending her eye for the visual to the physical. Her daughter, Natasha Sultan, later joined after honing her skills in the world of contemporary and vintage jewelry. The duo produces compelling, timeless, design-forward furniture and accessories that encourage you to stop and take a moment: From the lounge chairs with hand-stitched detailing, to the side chairs with tapered legs, each piece boasts contours that seem to naturally fit the human form. It's worth a visit to the the recently-opened Chinatown location (note: it's best to make an appointment ahead).

Cuyana

Cuyana

29 Prince St, New York | 917.409.0432

Cuyana has long been our go-to for small leather goods (shout-out to one particularly great Marie Kondo jewelry box collaboration). For their East Coast flagship, cofounders Karla Gallardo and Shilpa Shah took everything they knew from years of hosting pop-ups and created a pale-pink minimalist space. Visitors have the option of using small blocks shaped like laptops, water bottles, and cell phones to get a sense of a bag’s weight and look when it’s full of their personal items. There is also an in-store monogramming station—which is great if you’re in need of a quick, functional gift—and a well-edited clothing selection: silk camisoles, classic V-necks, and long, loose cardigans, all arranged by color.

Parachute Home

Parachute Home

129 Grand St., Soho | 646.429.9624

Inspired by the Italian linens she encountered on a trip to Amalfi several years ago, Parachute founder Ariel Kaye wanted to bring the same luxurious bedding to America. While the line started with bedding (the linen sheets are the only thing you’ll want to sleep in once you’ve tried them), the line has expanded to waffle bathrobes, Turkish towels, table linens, and throws. The New York flagship, which is set up like an apartment, with a living room, a functioning kitchen, a bedroom, and a vanity, pays homage to local artists, like Rodger Stevens, who designed the brass art installation in the entryway, and Brooklyn-based Rooted Design & Build, which created the natural wood table.