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The Fall/Winter Dance Roundup

The Fall/Winter Dance Roundup

As a follow-up to last month’s Culture Guide, we went a little deeper into dance, which is a particularly great holiday break option for little ones. And speaking of kids, there’s a Nutcracker production in each of the cities below—though the Parisian interpretation is best suited for adults.

Gala

Gala

Théâtre de la Ville, 2 Place du Châtelet | +331.42.74.22.77

As part of the Festival de Automne in Paris, the thoroughly post-modern Jérôme Bel brings random volunteers onstage for a dance performance. With totally un-trained and unprofessional acts, the result is actually somewhat impressive (if endearing). Beyond dance, the work breaks barriers and morphs into another framework: It becomes a poignant set of portraits. November 30 to December 2.

The Roots by Kader Attou

The Roots by Kader Attou

Palais de Chaillot, Place du Trocadero. +331.53.65.30.00

Famed hip-hop/Indian Kathak choreographer Kader Attou explores his roots in this aptly named production, but don't expect wild, joyful beats. This powerful piece is subdued—if you can believe it, hip-hop, breakdance, and popping can be melancholic——exploring his early memories of the schoolyard back home. From December 23 to 30. Photo: Joao Garcia

Quatre Pieces

Quatre Pieces

Téâtre Chaillot, 1 Place du Trocadero | +33.1.53.65.30.00

New York's esteemed postmodern choreographer Trish Brown is showing up in Paris for a short stint at the Teatre Chaillot, where her company will present four of her greatest hits, "Solos Olos," "Gone Fishin," "Rogues," and "PRESENT TENSE," which span 20-some years of her illustrious career. Be warned, this is pretty serious and spare modern dance: Some of the routines take place in utter silence, and the costumes, staging, and props are kept to a minimum. It's dance for serious aficionados. November 11 to 17. Photo: Stephanie Berger

Un Malambo

Un Malambo

Maison des Cultures de la Monde, 101 Blvd Raspail | +33.1.45.44.72.30

In Paris there's tango every now and then, but Malambo, its 17th-century precursor from the Argentinian plains, is another story. A collaboration between choreographer Diana Theocharidis and esteemed malambo musicians (and "bandaleon" players), this show revives an ancient dance and introduces an aspect of Argentinian culture to a whole new audience. The Gaucho attire the dancers wear is pretty cool to see, too. October 30 and 31.

La Bayadère

La Bayadère

Opéra Bastille, Place de la Bastille | +33.8.92.89.90.90

This is the ballet that Rudolf Nureyev brought to Paris with the Kirov in 1961—when it was done, he never returned to his native Russia. Besides the significance of this piece in the history of dance, The Paris Ballet also puts on an awe-inspiring experience, with gold-laden sets inspired by ancient Persian and Indian tales, and of course, a deep-dive into Nureyev's original choreography. From November 17 to December 31. Photo: Agathe Poupeney/OnP

John Adams, Lucinda Childs, & Frank Gehry: Available Light

John Adams, Lucinda Childs, & Frank Gehry: Available Light

Théâtre de la Ville, 2 Place du Châtelet |+33.1.42.74.22.77

At the Festival d'Automne in Paris this year, American music, choreography, and even design and architecture are all having a moment. Lucinda Childs and composer John Adams have collaborated on a new rendition of Childs' post-modern masterpiece, and Gehry has joined in on the set design. The fact that Gehry recently completed his impressive sail-like structure for the Foundation LVMH nearby makes this production all the more timely and relevant. From October 30 through November 7. Photo: Craig T. Mathew

Iolanta & The Nutcracker

Iolanta & The Nutcracker

Palais Garnier, Place de la Opèra

This is (literally) an all-singing, all-dancing production of two of composer Piotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky's most famous creations—also, two of his last, both performed at the Mariinksy in 1892. Iolanta was his final opera, and in this brand new production, it will be juxtaposed with an unusually serious rendition of The Nutcracker. Benjamin Millepied has come in to lead the choreography, which befits a production of this heft. From March 7 to April 1. Photo: Cig Harvey