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The Palm Springs Guide

The Palm Springs Guide

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Palm Springs was a wellness destination as far back as the early 1900s (all that dry heat), before evolving into a glamorous, Hollywood, Halston-wearing escape in the ’50s and ’60s. These days, both sides of its personality remain strong, as you can tell from its mind-boggling collection of healthy restaurants, preserved mid-century buildings, and retro diners. But the area continues to evolve every year as new generations discover the charms of this playground in the desert. Which is exactly why we’ve had our eye on the recent crop of hotel, restaurant, and store openings. Palm Springs (and nearby Joshua Tree, Pioneertown, and Yucca Valley) is unlike any other place in the world. It’s hard to believe that this convergence of past and present and style and wellness is only a couple hours from LA—depending on traffic, of course.

Bootlegger Tiki

Bootlegger Tiki

1101 N. Palm Canyon Dr., Movie Colony | 760.318.4154

Brainchild of Jaime Kowal and Chris Pardo (the dynamic duo behind neighboring Ernest Coffee), Bootlegger Tiki—with its totem poles, novelty lighting, and various pictures of topless ladies on the walls—is the epitome of a kitschy tiki bar. Best part: happy hour is a daily occurrence here, meaning the elaborate rum-centric concoctions (Mai Tai, Daiquiri, Blue Hawaii, and more) can be enjoyed at deep discounts from four to six.

High Bar at the Rowan

High Bar at the Rowan

100 W. Tahquitz Canyon Way, Midtown | 760.904.5015

Refreshing drinks like the frozen Aperol spritz and a passionfruit makeover of the gin fizz—plus light bites like ceviche and a minty melon-arugula salad—make swimsuit-clad, poolside dining comfortable in a destination as searing hot as Palm Springs. The rooftop bar is the perfect spot to people watch as the scene shifts from lively in the afternoon to peaceful at sunset.

Seymour’s

Seymour’s

233 E. Palm Canyon Dr., Twin Palms | 760.892.9000

This speakeasy-style cocktail den occupies a hidden space inside the steakhouse, Mr. Lyons (ask the host to point you in the right direction). Once inside, it’s easy for forget what decade it is. There are vintage photographs lining the walls, antique velvet seating, and even a black-and-white tv to set the retro mood. The whole thing is wonderfully old school, and a quiet place for a nightcap—try the Oaxacan Brunch, made with Gem & Bolt mezcal, lime juice, sage-infused simple syrup, and egg white.