Travel

The Dallas Guide

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This month, goop hits Dallas’s Highland Park Village for the second time. We’ve spent time getting reacquainted with our favorite spots (the Rosewood Mansion, Forty Five Ten, you know who you are) as well as hunting down the best of the new openings (Bullion and Sachet, you guys are just the best). In true goop form, we’ve sipped our share of mezcal, shopped the boutiques, and eaten perhaps more BBQ than we should have. But we did it all to bring you the best of what this city has to offer.

Dallas Contemporary

Dallas Contemporary

161 Glass St., Design District | 214.821.2522

This non-collecting museum has been pushing the boundaries of the Dallas art scene for thirty years. Mary Katrantzou and Richard Phillips are just a few of the artists who have shown work here, and entry to the museum is always free. Members get access to the show-opening parties, which are absolutely worth it.

Dallas Museum of Art

Dallas Museum of Art

1717 N. Harwood St., Downtown | 214.922.1200

The permanent art collection here cannot be dismissed: There are Monets, Manets, and Rauschenbergs, plus one of the largest Impressionist and Post-Impressionist collections in the country. But all that said, the museum’s design and local crafts holdings from around the world are just as impressive, from pre-Columbian artifacts to African masks and ceremonial attire to Eero Saarinen’s Tulip Chair. Admission is free. Photo courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

The Goss-Michael Foundation

The Goss-Michael Foundation

1305 Wycliff Ave., Suite 120, Design District | 214.696.0555

Founded by the late George Michael and curator Kenny Goss, the Goss-Michael Foundation focuses on edgy British contemporary art. The permanent collection is amazing, with more than 500 works by artists like Tracey Emin, Damien Hirst, and Sir Michael Craig-Martin, but it’s the exhibitions that combine the works of up-and-coming British artists with local artists that are unique and particularly interesting.

Katy Trail

Katy Trail

Ranging along the tracks of a long-abandoned railroad line, the Katy Trail is a beautifully landscaped three-and-a-half-mile running/walking/biking path that cuts through some of the busiest parts of town. It makes for a great jog, with CrossFit equipment stops scattered along the way.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Nasher Sculpture Center

2001 Flora St., Downtown | 214.242.5100

Adjacent to the Dallas Museum of Art and open to the public since 2003, this private collection, owned by the Nasher family, is one of the most stunning in the world, including works by everyone from Auguste Rodin and Paul Gauguin to Richard Serra, Ellsworth Kelly, and Tony Smith. The grounds match the work with a sprawling garden by Peter Walker and a glass Renzo Piano pavilion that barely interrupts the landscape. And not to be missed (from May until October): The Nasher hosts the ’til Midnight program, staying open late for film screenings and outdoor concerts.

Perot Museum of Nature & Science

Perot Museum of Nature & Science

2201 N. Field St., Downtown | 214.428.5555

Opened in late 2012, the new science museum is a must-see, not only for its stunning permanent exhibits and traveling shows but also for Thom Mayne’s groundbreaking sustainable building, which boasts a glass-enclosed staircase that cuts right through the structure. There is so much to see here that you might want to break it up into a couple of trips, but our favorite by far is the gems and minerals hall, which among other phenomena, includes an amazing five-foot geode. Plus, if you have little ones, the Children’s Museum alone is practically worth the day trip with all its requisite slides, crawl spaces, and sandpits.

The State Fair of Texas

The State Fair of Texas

3921 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd., Dallas | 214.565.9931

The Texas State Fair is everything you might expect: country-and-western shows, livestock competitions, roller coasters, and food booths that will fry just about anything. Less expected are the tiny homes exposition, where every dwelling is less than 300 square feet, and the vegan-food pavilion. Open for only three weeks a year, the fairgrounds are filled with ornate Art Deco buildings built in the 1930s, and there’s also a lake you can paddle across in a swan boat.