Beauty

MDs Get Real

MDs Get Real:
Lasers, Peels, Botox, and More

The basic messages have gotten through to us: Wear SPF every day, eat well, exercise, exfoliate, moisturize, don’t pick at your skin, and stay out of the midday sun. Dermatologists and plastic surgeons are forever repeating the basics of good skin care for their clients, but nudge one and some less-expected secrets come pouring out. Just some of the things we learned when we asked some of our favorite skin MDs: A visit to the dentist might cause breakouts; there’s a laser for bruising; Botox and yoga do not mix.

1

Whitney Bowe, MD

New York dermatologist; author of The Beauty of Dirty Skin; medical director of Integrative Dermatology, Aesthetics & Wellness at Advanced Dermatology; and clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

“Salicylic acid peels can actually have sun-protective effects. Glycolic acid peels, on the other hand, can make you more prone to sunburn, so avoid them in the summer.”

2

Julius Few, MD

Chicago plastic surgeon, founder of the Few Institute, clinical professor of surgery at the University of Chicago, and health science clinician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital

“Filler in moderation is a good thing, but overuse really ages the appearance of the face. If you overexpose tissue to too much filler, it puffs up that area. Then when the filler is eventually reabsorbed, you’re left with droopiness.”

3

Robert Anolik, MD

New York dermatologist and clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the NYU School of Medicine

“If you bruise in the days after filler or Botox, we can use lasers designed to reduce the appearance of broken blood vessels, sometimes within a matter of hours. Instead of targeting blood inside the vessels, we use the laser to target blood outside of the vessels (what appears as a bruise). It just feels like a few rubber band snaps.”

4

Doris Day, MD

New York dermatologist; author of Beyond Beautiful: Using the Power of Your Mind and Aesthetic Breakthroughs to Look Naturally Young and Radiant; founder of Day Dermatology & Aesthetics; and clinical associate professor of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Centers

“Overcleansing is just as bad as not cleansing. Your face wash shouldn’t use harsh sulfates; it should have emollient oils and humectants to help pull moisture into the skin.”

5

Jeanine Downie, MD

Montclair, New Jersey, cosmetic dermatologist; director of Image Dermatology; and fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology

“Our skin reacts to both indoor and outdoor lighting, so even if you’re inside all day, you should still wash your face in the morning and put on sunscreen, then reapply it again in the middle of the day.”

6

Barbara Sturm, MD

Dusseldorf, Germany, aesthetic doctor; former orthopedist; and founder of Dr. Barbara Sturm Skincare and Dr. Barbara Sturm Clinic

“Acidic food like sodas, grains, and eggs, and inflammatory food like processed meat, fried food, and dairy can create skin problems. By the same token, avoid sparkling water, which has an acidic pH of 3 to 4.”

7

Macrene Alexiades, MD

New York dermatologist, founder of Dermatology and Laser Surgery Center of New York, associate clinical professor at Yale University, and adjunct professor at Sigros Hospital, University of Athens

“Don’t go to the dentist after any treatment at the dermatologist. The extra manipulation and saliva can cause you to break out.”

8

Karyn Grossman, MD

Los Angeles and New York cosmetic dermatologist, founder of Grossman Dermatology, clinical associate professor of dermatology at the Keck School of Medicine USC, affiliated physician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, and founder of the skin-care line KARYNG

“If you superplump your lips multiple times, you’ll permanently stretch the skin. If you later decide you no longer want big lips, it will require surgery—and a scar—to get them back to the way they were.”

9

Whitney Bowe, MD

New York dermatologist; author of The Beauty of Dirty Skin; medical director of Integrative Dermatology, Aesthetics & Wellness at Advanced Dermatology; and clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

“Don’t get a facial, especially one that involves massage, the same day as Botox or fillers. You could end up with a drooping eyelid or swelling so bad your eyes are swollen shut the next morning! I tell my patients no downward dog, no nap, no facial for at least four hours.”

10

Julius Few, MD

Chicago plastic surgeon, founder of the Few Institute, clinical professor of surgery at the University of Chicago, and health science clinician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital

“As you get past fifty, Botox can become more challenging to place in the forehead. The brows can spike up and/or pull the skin of the upper eyelids in a way that looks less natural. Instead, the thing to do is change where you treat the forehead—injecting more toward the side of the face in a zone between the temple and the eye, as opposed to right above the brows, really helps.”

11

Barbara Sturm, MD

Dusseldorf, Germany, aesthetic doctor; former orthopedist; and founder of Dr. Barbara Sturm Skincare and Dr. Barbara Sturm Clinic

“When you have injections done or medical needling—anything that punctures the skin—don’t have acid peels right after. The combination can cause hyperpigmentation.”

12

Julius Few, MD

Chicago plastic surgeon, founder of the Few Institute, clinical professor of surgery at the University of Chicago, and health science clinician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital

“There are three main components of aging: wrinkles, loss of volume, and sagging. If you treat just one of those issues or rely on just one modality to address them, it looks unnatural. It’s like getting the oil changed in your car but ignoring everything else.”

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