Wellness

The Office Candy Dish + Other Stories

We’ve corralled all the best wellness reads from around the internet—just in time for your weekend bookmarking. This week: the link between depression and inflammation, how air pollution could contribute to dementia later in life, and the cruel temptation of the office candy jar.

  • The Hidden Life of the Office Candy Dish and What It Means When You Take a Piece

    The Hidden Life of the Office Candy Dish and What It Means When You Take a Piece

    Washington Post

    The #goophq offices have less of a communal candy dish and more of a constant onslaught of treats in celebration of holidays (ahem, Valentines Day), birthdays, or just because—here, some intel about the social ecosystem surrounding the traditional office candy dish, including some interesting findings about why people choose to have them at all.

  • Human Embryo Editing Gets the OK—but No Superbabies

    Human Embryo Editing Gets the OK—but No Superbabies

    Wired

    The National Academy of Sciences just released a major report outlining the ethics of gene manipulation. The report paves the way for using gene manipulation to address genetic disease, but not inherited ones (which many argue could pave the way to a future that includes so-called superbabies).

  • Should Emotions Be Taught in Schools?

    Should Emotions Be Taught in Schools?

    TED

    If you ask us? Heck yeah. Here, a few different strategies teachers are employing in the classroom that could ultimately lead to adults who can experience (and ultimately control) their emotions in a healthier way.

  • The Mental Health Hack

    The Mental Health Hack

    California Sunday Magazine

    The second deep-dive we’ve highlighted about the tech startups who are poised to make big moves in the mental health space. Here, Diana Kapp tests out Lantern, which is specifically designed to address eating disorders.

  • The Underlying Mechanisms of Depression

    The Underlying Mechanisms of Depression

    Found My Fitness

    Dr. Rhonda Patrick just debuted a new video style featuring some cool graphics that make her content (which we love for never being dumbed down) a little bit easier to digest for those of us without a Ph.D. Even more interesting—the discussion about the connection between inflammation and depression.

  • Air Pollution May Lead to Dementia in Older Women

    Air Pollution May Lead to Dementia in Older Women

    Science Daily

    A study out of the University of California found that air pollution particles (primarily from power plants and cars) could greatly increase womens’ chances of developing dementia late in life. Californians, in particular, should take note, as six of the ten urban areas with the worst air pollution are here in the state.

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