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The Best Summer ’15 Reading

Whether you’re heading to the beach or looking for a great read to pass the time on your morning subway commute, the below are compelling without being too overwhelmingly heavy.

Fiction

  • The Rocks, by Peter Nichols

    The Rocks, by Peter Nichols

    This is a really well done, subtle mystery, set over a span of 60 years in Mallorjca. It unravels the relationship between two families in reverse chronological order making for a compelling, can’t-put-it-down read, which strikes that perfect balance between light and heady. (I.e., it’s a good book that will hold your attention on a busy beach day.)

  • The Luckiest Girl Alive, by Jessica Knoll

    The Luckiest Girl Alive, by Jessica Knoll

    The Luckiest Girl is billed by many as the ultimate fix for those suffering Gone Girl withdrawals, but we think the twisted storyline and deeply layered narrator, Ani, are in a class all their own. Word is Reese Witherspoon loved it so much she’s already secured the movie rights.

  • Eight Hundred Grapes, by Laura Dave

    Eight Hundred Grapes, by Laura Dave

    Laura Dave’s latest is just another shining example of her expertise in exploring complex relationships and all the heartache, nuance, and ultimately, joy, that comes with them. Set on a Sonoma vineyard, Eight Hundred Grapes (her fourth novel), explores a world of deep-rooted family secrets.

  • The Light of the World, by Elizabeth Alexander

    The Light of the World, by Elizabeth Alexander

    Elizabeth Alexander is the Pulitzer Prize nominated poet, who among other accolades, delivered a poem at President Obama’s first inauguration. This is Alexander’s deeply touching memoir, which chronicles the aftershocks of her husband’s death. The topic of grief is not necessarily an easy one, but her compelling writing style lends it much beauty.

  • A Window Opens, by Elisabeth Egan

    A Window Opens, by Elisabeth Egan

    Elisabeth Egan is the books editor at Glamour, which makes sense: The protagonist of this fun, breezy read finds herself needing to ditch her plush, part-time job (books editor at a magazine) for a bigger salary at a booming start-up after her husband leaves his law-firm. It’s a heartfelt and sometimes funny look at all sorts of change: From marriage, to loss, to parenting, to the future of media. (Out on August 25th.)

  • Everybody Rise, by Stephanie Clifford

    Everybody Rise, by Stephanie Clifford

    This is the story of an over-reaching, status seeking recent college grad who takes a job driving membership for a social networking site for the jet set: And everything that happens when this fabricated world crumbles beneath her. It’s a fun page-turner from a New York Times reporter that lives in the world of Curtis Sittenfeld’s Prep: It revolves around boarding schools, the UES, and Lake George. (Out on August 18th.)

Non-Fiction

  • Happily Ali After, by Ali Wentworth

    Happily Ali After, by Ali Wentworth

    In Ali Wentworth’s latest memoir—thinly veiled as a stab at self-improvement—she tells hilarious story after story. It’s the sort of book you’ll read through in a single sitting: It’s light, laugh out loud, and heartfelt, with plenty of moments that will resonate with women everywhere.

  • The French Beauty Solution, by Mathilde Thomas

    The French Beauty Solution, by Mathilde Thomas

    How French women maintain virtual agelessness while indulging in cheese, carbs, and wine on the regular has mystified generations of American women. Turns out, it’s the wine, or rather, the grapes from which it’s born, that pack a ton of anti-aging benefits. And that’s just one of many beauty-related tidbits you’ll find in Caudalíe founder Mathilde Thomas’s first beauty book.

  • Modern Romance, by Aziz Ansari

    Modern Romance, by Aziz Ansari

    Ok, so it’s no secret that Aziz Ansari is pee-your-pants hilarious. His insights into serious matters of the heart and dating in the digital age, however, are freakishly spot-on. And it’s not all comedy either—he teamed up with sociologist Eric Klinenberg for the project.

  • Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coate

    Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coate

    Dealing primarily with America’s history of racism and injustice toward minorities, Ta-Nehisi Coate’s book is not light reading by any means, but it is essential. While it’s addressed to Coate’s son, it’s relevant to readers of all ages and backgrounds .



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