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    Spilling the Beans

    Beans are a great food. Gluten-free, full of protein, cheap and super-healthy, all they need is a good recipe to make them into a hearty meal. We had a great time developing these recipes that aren't just your usual chili.

    Also, a peek into the Frieze Art Fair happening now in London.

    Love,

    gp

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    Cooking Beans

    Below are a few bean-based dishes we’ve cooked up lately plus some helpful tips on cooking with beans.

    Cooking beans

    Logistics

    1 cup of dry beans should be cooked in about 3 cups of water.

    1 cup of dry beans yields about 2-3 cups cooked.

    If beans require soaking, do so in cold water for 4-12 hours (generally, the bigger the bean the longer the soak time).

    If you don’t have time to soak, cover beans with 2 inches of water and boil for 2 minutes.

    Tips

    1

    Rinse and sort: Whether you're using dried or canned beans, rinsing the beans before you cook or use them is a good idea. If you’re using dried beans, be sure to sift through to make sure any shriveled beans or small stones are removed.

    1

    Boil then simmer: Always drop beans into boiling water, then immediately bring down to a simmer.

    1

    Cook with kombu: A staple in macrobiotic cooking and used to add flavor to broths in Japanese cooking, kombu (sold in dried strips at health food stores or Asian supermarkets) contains an enzyme that can help us digest beans. Also, adding a drop of vinegar or lemon to beans once they’re cooked can help with digestion (and adds flavor).

    1

    Cook clean: Wait to add your salt or acid (vinegar or lemon) until after the beans are cooked. Adding them to the water while they’re cooking can delay the process.

    1

    BPA-free: If you’re using canned, try to find cans that are BPA-free. Eden Organic is a great go-to option and they prepare their beans with kombu.

    Cooking times for beans in this week's recipes:

    Type

    Soak

    Cook

    Adzuki Beans

    yes

    50 minutes

    Black beans

    yes

    1.5 hours

    Black-eyed peas

    yes

    1 hour

    Cannellini beans

    yes

    1.5 hours

    Chickpeas

    yes

    1.5 - 2 hours

    Great Northern

    yes

    1 hour

    Lentils

    no

    25-30 minutes

    Roasted Chickpeas with Romanesco,
    Peppers + Anchovies

    Chickpeas
    Chickpeas

    We tried the recipe with cauliflower in the test kitchen and again with romanesco for the shoot. Both work just as well.

    ingredients

    makes 2-4

    • 1 head romanesco (or cauliflower), torn into pieces
    • 1 1/2 cups (or small can) cooked chickpeas
    • 1 bell pepper, roughly chopped
    • 2 teaspoons capers
    • 2-3 anchovies
    • olive oil
    • salt + pepper

    preparation

    1.

    Pre-heat oven to 400°F. Place romanesco, chickpeas and bell pepper onto a baking sheet. Sprinkle capers on top. Using your fingers, tear up anchovies and place on the pieces of bell pepper (the anchovies will melt into the pepper while cooking – delish). Sprinkle with salt and pepper and drizzle olive oil on top.

    2.

    Place tray in oven and cook for about 15 minutes. Remove, shake the pan to move the veggies and chickpeas around and place back in oven to roast for about another 10 minutes until the romanesco is nice and partially charred and peppers are soft and edges begin to brown.

    Super-Healthy Kosheri

    One of our favorite bean recipes from It’s All Good, this kosheri is the most delicious dish. Plus, lentils and brown rice eaten together make a really good protein for vegetarian/vegans.

    From It’s All Good: “My brother Jake’s favorite side dish is kosheri (sometimes spelled koshary, kushari, or koshari), which is among the most popular street foods in Egypt. Cheap, filling, and flavorful, it’s traditionally made with white rice, fried onions, lentils, and broken pieces of pasta and is often served with an oily, spicy tomato sauce. I’ve simplified the recipe and made it a bit healthier, too, leaving out the pasta and sauce, swapping brown rice for the white rice, and slowly cooking the onions to get tremendous flavor without buckets of oil. This is just as successful made with quinoa (simply substitute it for the brown rice and reduce the cooking time from 45 to 20 minutes). Though it requires an additional dish to clean, my absolute favorite variation is to make one pot of the brown rice version and one pot of the quinoa version and then combine them.”

    ingredients

    makes 4

    • 1/3 cup lentils (preferably the dark-green French variety called du Puy)
    • extra virgin olive oil
    • 1 very large yellow Spanish onion (or 2 regular yellow onions), peeled and thinly sliced
    • a 2-inch cinnamon stick
    • 4 cardamon pods, crushed with the side of your knife
    • 3 whole cloves
    • 1 cup long-grain brown rice (or quinoa)
    • coarse sea salt
    • 1 3/4 cups water, vegetable stock or chicken stock

    preparation

    1.

    Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil and add the lentils. Lower the heat and simmer just until the lentils are cooked through, about 25 minutes. Drain the lentils and set them aside.

    2.

    Heat 1/4 cup of the olive oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring now and then, until totally soft and caramelized, a solid 1/2 hour. Set the onions aside.

    3.

    Meanwhile, heat about 3 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the spices and the rice or quinoa and cook the grains until they turn opaque and the spices are fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add a big pinch of salt and the water or stock. Bring to a boil, turn the heat to low, cover, and cook for 45 minutes if you’re doing the brown rice version or just 20 if you’re using quinoa. Turn off the heat and let the mixture sit for 10 minutes. Uncover, fluff with a fork, and fold in the lentils and onions.

    Excerpted from the book IT’S ALL GOOD by Gwyneth Paltrow. © 2013 by Gwyneth Paltrow. Reprinted by permission of Grand Central Life & Style. All rights reserved.

    Stella McCartney x goop

    Our new stella x goop dress @HelloRoss.

    Cannellini Bean + Quinoa Burgers

    Cannellini bean + quinoa burger

    Served stacked or on a platter, these vegan and gluten-free burgers are easier to make than they look.

    ingredients

    makes 4-6 burgers

    • 1 1/2 cups (or small can) cooked cannellini beans
    • 1 cup cooked quinoa
    • 1/4 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs
    • 2 shallots, diced
    • 1 garlic clove, minced
    • 1/2 teaspoon fennel, crushed
    • 2 teaspoons cumin
    • healthy handful of parsley, chopped
    • olive oil
    • salt + pepper

    preparation

    1.

    Place a large frying pan over medium high heat and drizzle with olive oil (about 2 tablespoons). Add shallots and cook for a minute until they begin to soften. Add garlic, fennel and cumin and cook for another minute until the herbs are aromatic and the garlic softens. Remove from heat and cool.

    2.

    Place the beans, quinoa and breadcrumbs in a large mixing bowl. Add the parsley and cooled shallot mixture and set the pan aside but don’t clean (you’ll use this later to fry the patties). Combine everything together with your hands, mashing the beans so that the mixture turns into a paste. (If it’s feeling a little wet, add more breadcrumbs.) Season with salt and pepper.

    3.

    When combined, form the mixture into small patties, about the size of your palm and about an inch thick.

    4.

    Place your frying pan back on the stove over medium high heat and add a drizzle of olive oil to coat. Cook the patties in batches for about 3 minutes on each side until nice and golden brown. Remove from pan and immediately season with salt and a drizzle of lemon. Serve with lettuce, tomato, red onion, Veganaise and/or whatever else you like.

    Three Bean Salad with Sautéed Chard

    Three bean salad with sautee chard

    Adding the lightly wilted fall chard makes all the difference in this three bean salad. This is a great dish to throw in a jar or container and take to work for a healthy room temperature lunch.

    ingredients

    makes 4

    • 1 1/2 cups (or small can) of cooked great northern beans
    • 1 1/2 cups (or small can) of cooked adzuki beans
    • 1 1/2 cups (or small can) of cooked black-eyed peas
    • 1 cup packed rainbow chard, chopped (including some of the stems – they add color and texture to the salad)
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • healthy handful of parsley, chopped
    • 3 scallions, chopped
    • 1/4 cup olive oil (plus a tablespoon more for cooking)
    • 1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar
    • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    • 1/2 a lemon
    • salt + pepper

    preparation

    1.

    Place a large frying pan over medium high heat. Add a drizzle of olive oil (about a tablespoon) and the minced garlic. Cook for about 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the chard and cook for about 2 minutes, stirring throughout, until wilted. Drizzle with lemon to keep from browning and set aside.

    2.

    In a small mixing bowl, add the mustard and the vinegar. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil until incorporated. Season with salt and pepper.

    3.

    Add all the beans to a large mixing bowl. Pour the dressing over top and mix. Add the chard and the herbs. Mix to combine and season to taste.

    Slow-Braised Green Beans

    Slow-braised green beans

    There was some discussion in the test kitchen on whether to use fresh or canned tomatoes for braising the green beans. After a few trials, we decided fresh is best, keeping the dish a bit lighter. Though we love the simply blanched, French-style green bean preparation, slow-braising them with tomatoes makes for an incredibly tasty and warming preparation. Perfect for going into fall.

    In the test kitchen

    ingredients

    makes 4

    • 1 1/2 pounds green beans, trimmed
    • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 2 large, ripe tomatoes
    • 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable stock
    • 1/2 lemon, juiced
    • olive oil
    • salt + pepper

    preparation

    1.

    Place a large, wide pot (a dutch oven works well for this) over medium high heat. Coat the bottom of the pot with olive oil and add the onion. Cook for about a minute until soft and translucent, then add the garlic and cook for another minute until soft.

    2.

    Add the green beans and the stock. Using your hands, crush the tomatoes into the pot and mix. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and turn heat down to a medium-low heat. Cook for about 2 hours, until beans are very tender and beginning to fall apart. Serve at room temperature.

    Frieze Fringe

    It’s Frieze this coming weekend in London and there’s plenty to see in the city. Below, a mix of big names we love and new kids on the block that
    we’re excited about.

    JR, Actions, on the streets and at Lazarides.

    Philip-Lorca diCorcia, East of Eden at David Zwirner.

    Out of Context and the David Lynch Foundation have curated Feeling Good, a group exhibition including this photograph by Gary Powell, at the Getty Images Gallery.

    Kehinde Wiley, The World Stage: Jamaica at Stephen Friedman.

    Copyright the artist. Courtesy the artists and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.

    The Waldorf Project, Experimental Lab Chapter 2 COLOUR at Bosse & Baum.

    Group show including Sterling Ruby, Ai Weiwei and more around Alduous Huxley’s novel Island at the Dairy Art Centre.

    Morris Louis, Cyprien Gaillard at Sprüth Magers.

    Stuart Semple, Suspend Disbelief in a 19th century home in Regent’s Park.

    Black Bean + Roasted Butternut Squash Chili

    Black bean + roasted butternut squash chili

    We roast the squash separately for this spiced chili as the rich flavor of the roasted butternut is too good to skip. If time is short and you want to throw the squash in at the start to boil with the dry beans, that’s fine too.

    ingredients

    makes 4

    • 1 cup dry black beans
    • 1 small onion, diced
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 small can diced tomatoes
    • 4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
    • 1 teaspoon cumin
    • 2 teaspoons ancho chili powder (plus more for sprinkling the squash)
    • 2 chipotle peppers (packed in adobo), roughly chopped
    • 1/2 of a small butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    • salt + pepper

    preparation

    1.

    Pre-heat oven to 400°F. Place squash in a single layer on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with the ancho chili powder. Season with salt and pepper and place in oven for about 10 minutes. Remove and shake the pan to move the squash around. Return to the oven for about another 10 minutes until squash is soft and beginning to brown. Remove and set aside.

    2.

    Heat a large heavy pot (a dutch oven works great for this) over medium high heat. Add the dry herbs and cook for about 15-30 seconds until lightly toasted and fragrant.

    3.

    Add a healthy drizzle of olive oil to coat the pan and the onions. Cook for about a minute until they soften. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Add the rest of the ingredients – the chipotle peppers, black beans, stock and tomatoes – and mix to combine. Bring to a light boil, then turn the heat down to a simmer and cook for about 2-3 hours, until black beans are tender.

    4.

    When ready to serve, fold the squash into the chili. Ladle into bowls and serve with sour cream or strained yogurt, lime and cilantro.

    Basic Lentil Soup

    Basic lentil soup

    Lentil soup has many lives – some with curry, some puréed until smooth and some kept chunky. This is our basic, everyday recipe – simple to prepare and a delicious kitchen staple. This also freezes quite well.

    ingredients

    makes 4

    • 1 cup dry lentils (any color except red)
    • 1 carrot, peeled and diced
    • 1 small yellow onion, diced
    • 3 garlic cloves, minced
    • 5 cups chicken or vegetable stock
    • 1 small can of diced tomatoes
    • 2 bay leaves
    • salt + pepper

    preparation

    1.

    Place a large pot over high heat with 4 cups of water. When the water comes to a boil, add the lentils, turn down to a simmer and cook for about 5 minutes. Drain the lentils, rinse and set aside.

    2.

    Place the pot back over medium high heat and coat with olive oil. Add the onion and carrots. Cook for about a minute until soft, then add the garlic and cook for another minute. Add the bay leaf and the lentils and cook for about 30 seconds, stirring to coat with the oil. Add the broth and the tomatoes and season with salt and pepper. Bring heat down to a medium, cover and cook until lentils are tender, about 25 minutes.

    3.

    Transfer 2 cups of the soup to blender and purée until smooth. Return the purée back to the pot and mix to combine. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with a drizzle of vinegar if desired. (FYI, we were split down the middle on the vinegar in the test kitchen – one of us loved, one hated, one was undecided.)

    Thanks to MARCH in San Francisco for letting us shoot on their beautiful kitchenware in their store.

    Photography by Angie Silvy.

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