Food

8 New (and New-to-Us) Cookbooks You’ll Actually Use

We love cookbooks. A lot. But the some of the new ones just out are really blowing our minds here in the goop kitchen. From Cherry Bombe to Raw Cake, they’re all pretty essential for anyone devoted to cookbooks—and they also make gorgeous, incredibly useful gifts. With that in mind, we’ve given some hints for who might love them most, along with our reviews.

  • Cherry Bombe by Kerry Diamond and Claudia Wu

    Cherry Bombe by Kerry Diamond and Claudia Wu

    For badass women in the kitchen, by badass women in the kitchen.

    Cherry Bombe is one of our all-time favorite magazines, championing women in food—from chefs and to restauranteurs to company founders—as if they were models and rock stars. The cookbook is as fun, surprising, diverse, and drop-dead beautiful as the contributors it features. Scratch-made manicotti, crab cakes with corn salsa, and classic yellow cake with chocolate frosting are, like everything in this book, totally delicious, eclectic home-runs.

  • The Impatient Foodie by Elettra Wiedemann

    The Impatient Foodie by Elettra Wiedemann

    For the chic, super-busy omnivore.

    Are you trying to do it all—while eating well? Elettra Wiedemann’s recipes range from vegan to non-vegan, healthy to more indulgent, from-scratch to semi-homemade, speaking to the “flexitarian” lifestyle so many of us have adopted. In short, she just gets us.

  • Cooking for Jeffrey by Ina Garten

    Cooking for Jeffrey by Ina Garten

    For anyone who has ever wished that they could be Jeffrey.

    Ina has never led us astray, and the only person who is a bigger fan of hers than us might be her beloved husband Jeffrey. In her latest book, Ina shares all of his favorites, including the classics you expect (brisket with onions and carrots) and some new faves (salmon tacos)—all of them knock-it-out-of-the-park great.

  • Dinner at the Long Table by Andrew Tarlow and Anna Dunn

    Dinner at the Long Table by Andrew Tarlow and Anna Dunn

    For the dedicated and ambitious cook.

    Beautiful, rustic, and worth every bit of effort they require, these recipes from Andrew Tarlow and Anna Dunn are completely spectacular. The menus designed by the Brooklyn duo are involved, too—to say the least—but they encourage the home cook to fully dive into the soulful experience of cooking and feeding others. Consider it a stunning ode to eating well.

  • Leave Me Alone with the Recipes by Cipe Pineles

    Leave Me Alone with the Recipes by Cipe Pineles

    For vintage lovers.

    Editors Sarah Rich and Wendy MacNaughton stumbled upon a beautifully hand-painted cookbook, which they later discovered was the unpublished manuscript of Conde Nast’s first female art director, Cipe Pineles, that had been written in 1945. Beautifully restored and with added notes from the editors and archival photographs of Cipe, this book is not only full of delightful vintage recipes and illustrations, but it gives you a glimpse into the past and the life of an (until now) unsung hero.

  • Nopalito by Gonzalo Guzmán

    Nopalito by Gonzalo Guzmán

    For the salsa obsessed.

    The first cookbook from wildly popular Nopalito in San Francisco is full of favorite dishes from the restaurant—and so much more. The elevated homestyle cooking is in large part inspired by Guzmán’s upbringing in Veracruz; they look and taste beyond-fantastic. We especially love the guide for building your Mexican pantry and the index of more than a dozen salsas!

  • Raw Cake by Daisy Kristiansen and Leah Garwood-Gowers

    Raw Cake by Daisy Kristiansen and Leah Garwood-Gowers

    For the health nut who can’t say no to dessert.

    The women of London’s The Hardihood have crammed all their best recipes and ideas into this beautiful new cookbook. The intro to essential raw pastry tools and techniques makes the sometimes-seemingly impossible task of creating delicious raw desserts at home totally doable. Convert your friends with Salted Caramel Crunch bars—no one we know can resist them!

  • The Greenhouse Cookbook: Plant-Based Eating and DIY Juicing by Emma Knight

    The Greenhouse Cookbook: Plant-Based Eating and DIY Juicing by Emma Knight

    For the next-level plant-based cook.

    Knight and co. are “flavor focused,” so you won’t feel like you’re missing out on anything, whether you’re indulging in chocolate hazelnut spread on ancient-grain bread, Moroccan sweet-potato hash or vanilla-bean cheesecake with whipped coconut cream. And that’s just the food! Nearly half the book is actually drinks—smoothies, nut milks, tonics, and juices—all of them amazingly delicious and fun to make.

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